Two Mountains District

SUMMARY OF THE PLAN TO RELOCATE
THE DAN BEARD CABIN
TO GOOSE POND SCOUT RESERVATION

NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA COUNCIL – BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

BACKGROUND

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Council of the Boy Scouts of America was approached by representatives of Woodloch Pines Resort in Pike County Pennsylvania in the fall of 2009 concerning the possible donation of a log cabin that is on a property they purchased. They would like to use the property for purposes that requires the removal of the log cabin. The cabin was constructed by Daniel Carter Beard, a founding father of the Boy Scouts of America, for use at his camp. The cabin will be demolished and lost forever if it is not taken at this time.

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Council authorized the formation of a Dan Beard Cabin Committee to study the possibilities and ramifications of accepting the donation of the Dan Beard Cabin at its November 2009 Annual Meeting. The study, now complete, includes the historical importance of the Cabin, how the cabin will be used, the site location, estimated costs and possible fundraising ideas/sources.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Executive Board of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Council, Boy Scouts of America after careful consideration and determination of findings has approved the reconstruction of the Dan Beard Cabin at Goose Pond Scout Reservation.

The building will be a multi-functional space with no one proposed use precluding the others. We believe that these uses are compatible with the cabin’s original uses by Daniel Carter Beard when it served as his camp headquarters building and will serve the Boy Scout program at Goose Pond Scout Reservation well.

The cabin will be located on a site between the Capouse campsite and the COPE (Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience) course, on the lake side of the camp road. The cabin will be used as the headquarters of the "Pathways" Program for brand new Scouts at summer camp, Troop winter camping, Leadership Development Training Programs and events, meetings, and other special events such as Eagle Scout Ceremonies and Boards of Review. The cabin will include a small museum/interpretative area pertaining to Daniel Carter Beard and the History of the Cabin.

The construction will occur in three phases for funding purposes but may be constructed in a single phase if sufficient funds are secured. The construction is further subdivided into seven stages. The committee has engaged an experienced log cabin builder to estimate the costs of the reconstruction, which is estimated at a total of $207,250. It is anticipated that some of the work will be completed with volunteer labor, borrowed equipment and donated materials, which will reduce this cost. The first phase of the reconstruction may be completed for an estimated cost of $143,550.

It has been determined that funding for this project should not negatively impact the funding of normal operations of the Council. A number of potential funding sources have been identified. It has been determined that 110% of the funding required for any stage of construction be secured as cash before beginning that stage to ensure that the cabin project does not result in a negative impact on the Council’s debt position.

HISTORICAL CONTEXT

Extensive research has been accomplished on Daniel Carter Beard, his Pike County camp and the log cabin which has confirmed that this cabin was constructed at Dan Beard’s camp in 1926 and was used as the camp headquarters and meeting area. Some of the interesting historical significance of this cabin is presented in Appendix 1.

SUGGESTED USES

The cabin can be used for a number of non-conflicting, compatible uses. This requires that no singular use be implemented in such a manner as to preclude the other uses.

Possible uses of the cabin include:

  • New Scout (Pathfinder) Program area at Boy Scout summer camp
  • Winter camping
  • Small historical interpretation area regarding the cabin and Daniel Carter Beard
  • Meeting room
  • Leadership Training development site
  • Small special events location

Other uses were discussed and determined to be inappropriate due to the nature of the building or to its connection with Daniel Carter Beard, or incompatible to other preferred uses. Uses discussed and determined to be inappropriate include:

  • Trading Post
  • Snack Bar
  • Administration Building
  • Museum

SITE LOCATION

The log cabin will be located at the Northeastern Pennsylvania Council’s Goose Pond Scout Reservation located in Paupack Township, Wayne County, Pennsylvania. Goose Pond is less than 15 miles from the current site of the log cabin and is the closest existing Boy Scout Camp to the former Dan Beard Camp. Goose Pond provides a setting where the best uses for the cabin can be realized. It was also determined that Goose Pond is in need of additional winter camping facilities, and an inclement weather program area during the summer camping season which this cabin will provide.

Within the Goose Pond property, a number of specific site locations for the building were discussed with the site located off of the camp road between the Capouse/Delaware campsite and the COPE course on the lake side of the road being selected. A map of the selected site is included in Appendix 2. The description of the location selected is as follows:

Cabin Site – is located between Capouse and COPE course on lakeside of the camp road. Recommended due to relatively gentle slope of the site, some woods, convenient location for summer camp program area, proximity to COPE course for possible use until a new building is constructed for COPE.

CONSTRUCTION AND PHASING

The log cabin has experienced some decline over the years. The logs are found to be in excellent condition, but the roof and porch decking require replacement. Woodloch has new roofing materials stored near the cabin and have agreed to donate them to the Council with the cabin. These materials have laid in storage for approximately two years and are being moved and stored properly in a new location at Goose Pond Scout Reservation.

Through research of the cabin, it has been determined that the cabin also had a lean-to roofed extension on the back and a loft area called the “Oriole’s nest” by Beard. The main effort shall be to reconstruct the main cabin and porch at Goose Pond. But it is also desirable to reconstruct the extension and the Oriole’s nest. Plans of the proposed cabin reconstruction noting the proposed three phases of the construction process is included in Appendix 3. The three phases are noted as follows:

Phase 1 – construction of the main cabin and porch. It also includes the foundation walls for Phase 2 and the one wall of the extension due to log jointing requirements. The cabin will be constructed on a spread footing foundation and crawl space. Foundation piers will provide support for the porch.

Phase 2 – construction of the lean-to extension. This space will provide four rooms. Two will provide separate winter sleeping areas for adults or women and be used as office/ program areas for summer camp. A third room provides kitchen space to eventually include a sink when water and sewer utility service is provided to this area of camp. The fourth area will initially be used as storage, but eventually be converted to a bathroom when water and sewer service is provided. The extension is constructed on a concrete foundation with a full basement storage space underneath for summer storage of winter camping equipment (e.g. cots) and winter storage of summer camp program supplies. The basement is day-lighted on the lake side of the structure for full access.

Phase 3 – Oriole’s Nest – The loft area known as the Oriole’s nest provides an interesting historic context given Beard’s authoring of a “Boy’s Life” magazine article pertaining to it in 1930. This phase of construction is the smallest but may pose the most challenges regarding construction methodologies, given that those employed in the initial construction are not adequate by today’s standards. A new beam and support design will need to be employed. The stairway to the nest is also challenging.

Construction may proceed with only Phase 1 and then have Phases 2 and 3 follow, or begin with Phases 1 and 2, or construct all 3 phases as once, depending upon the availability of funding.

The Committee has also recognized that the construction process may be further defined by smaller increments in order to meet the initial needs of securing and properly storing the available roofing materials, removing the building from its current site to meet Woodloch’s needs and beginning the process as soon as possible as sufficient funds are secured for each stage, instead of waiting for the total project funding to be in-place. Construction stages have been identified as follows:

Stage 1 – Secure and properly store the roofing materials donated by Woodloch
Stage 2 – Disassemble, move and store the cabin
Stage 3 – Site prep at Goose Pond Scout Reservation
Stage 4 – Construct Foundation
Stage 5 – Cabin construction Phase 1 (main cabin and porch)
Stage 6 – Cabin Construction Phase 2 (lean-to extension)
Stage 7 – Cabin Construction Phase 3 (Oriole’s nest)

ESTIMATE OF PROBABLE COST

Considerable effort has been made to estimate the probable cost of all labor, equipment and materials required to complete the project. The committee was fortunate to find an experienced log cabin contractor, The Cabin Doctor, who visited the site with committee representatives and provided multiple revisions to cost estimates as the construction requirements were defined and refined. A detailed estimate of costs is presented in Appendix 4. A summary of costs by Stages identified in the previous section of the report is as follows:

Stage 1 $0
Stage 2 19,400
Stage 3 6,000
Stage 4 14,600
Stage 5 103,550
Stage 6 47,900
Stage 7 15,800
TOTAL $207,250

FUNDING PLAN

The committee has determined that funding for this project should not negatively impact the funding of normal operations of the Council. Suggested parameters for the Cabin’s funding plan are presented in Appendix 5. Possible sources for funds identified and discussed by the committee include:

  • Recognition Dinner for John Kiesendahl
  • Masonic Lodges (Dan Beard was a Distinguished Mason)
  • Foundations and grants
  • Historic preservation groups
  • Selected organizations and individuals in the area who aren’t normal donors to the Council
  • Individuals and organizations with historical connection to Dan Beard, McPheters and the Dan Beard camp.


Prepared by:
The Dan Beard Cabin Committee of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Council, BSA

News Media Coverage of the
Dan Beard Cabin Relocation Project

Boy's Life - August 2011

Boy's Life - August 2011

Northeastern Pennsylvania Business Journal - February 2011 - Page 65

Link

WNEP-TV 16

January 16, 2001 - Some Boy Scouts are trying to save a piece of scouting history in the Poconos.

Boy Scouts young and old got to work Sunday on an old cabin near Hawley.

"We're pretty much de-chinking now, which means taking the stuff out from between the logs," explained Boy Scout Giancarlo Iona.

This is not just any cabin. It is the Daniel Beard cabin, named after one of the original founders of the Boy Scouts.

Go to wnep.com for full text of the report.

   

News Eagle - January 21, 2011

Dan Beard Boy Scout cabin to be restored

Lackawaxen Twp. — Woodloch Pines Resort has donated a historic cabin on their property to the Boys Scouts of America. The log cabin was used by one of the Scouts’ founders in the first half of the 20th Century.

The Northeast Pennsylvania (NEPA) Council of the Boy Scouts of America has plans to move it to the Goose Pond Boy Scout Reservation about 12 or 15 miles away, in Paupack Township.

Read Full Article . . .

Boys' Life Magazine - January 1930


Boys' Life Magazine - March 1929

The Northeastern Pennsylvania Council, Boy Scouts of America has begun the process of relocating and restoring an important piece of Scouting’s history.

This cabin, the last remaining part of the Dan Beard Outdoor School, a camp run by Daniel Carter Beard in Lackawaxen Township, Pike County, PA is being disassembled and moved 12 miles to Goose Pond Scout Reservation. This process is not a small undertaking, but by relocating and keeping this 1926 Kiva style log cabin in Upstate Pennsylvania we are not only preserving its history but are also honoring a beloved founder of the BSA, Dan Beard himself.

These pages will explain the history of the cabin and detail the restoration process. You will also be able to follow the project through our collection of pictures and images.

This project is being made possible with help from the many volunteers who are giving their time and labor freely. It cannot be completed, however, without the contributions and generosity of supporters like you. CLICK HERE to find out more about the Dan Beard Relocation Project or how to make a monetary donation to pay the costs of the relocation and rebuilding.

For more information, you can follow the project on our Facebook page, or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Saturday, Oct 1stSunday, Oct 2nd

Camp Acahela

New this year: Friday Sept 30th 
check-in and camping option.

This weekend of fun and adventure is open to all WEBELOS SCOUTS, their parent(s)/guardian(s), and WEBELOS Den Leaders / Den Chiefs.  New Scouts (4th and 5th graders) are encouraged to attend.

During the weekend Webelos Scouts may earn up to three STEM related WEBELOS ADVENTURE PINS and be introduced to the BSA NOVA and SUPERNOVA awards.

The weekend will include CAMPING - bring a tent, and COOKING - bring food to cook; plus Saturday night CAMP FIRE with skits and songs, and Sunday morning SCOUT'S OWN SERVICE.

NIAGARA FALLS

October 8-10, 2016

Corning Museum of Glass
Old Fort Niagara Program
American, Bridal & Horseshoe Falls
Maid of the Mist Boat Tour
Cave of the Winds
Niagara Adventure Theater
Niagara Aquarium
Niagara Gorge Discovery Center
Observation Deck
Niagara Power Project Vista
Buffalo & Erie County Naval & Military Park

 The Historic Traveling Camporee is a three-day weekend adventure by chartered bus, and is an event designed to expose our Boy Scout youth and leaders to, and expand their knowledge of, our country’s heritage. It is fun, educational and one-of-a-kind ~ one of Scouting’s mountaintop experiences. Out of almost three hundred councils across the United States, Northeastern Pennsylvania Council is the “ONLY” Boy Scout Council to host biennial Traveling Camporees on a regular basis. How many opportunities do YOU have to participate in a weekend Camporee by bus?

$12.00 per Person

Children five and
under are free
“with an adult paid ticket”

FREE Ticket for New Scouts!!

Once your application is turned in at
the Scout Service Center a free ticket
will be sent to your home.

 Tickets will be available at the Scout Shop on a first come, first serve basis.
(walk-ins without tickets will incur a $5 surcharge)

What Is Cub Scouts?

In 1930 the Boy Scouts of America launched a home- and neighborhood-centered program for boys 9 to 11 years of age. A key element of the program is an emphasis on caring, nurturing relationships between boys and their parents, adult leaders, and friends. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA's three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

Membership

Cub Scouting has program components for boys in the first through fifth grades (or ages 7, 8, 9, or 10). Members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. First-grade boys (Tiger Cubs) meet twice a month, while Wolf Cub Scouts (second graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third graders), and Webelos (fourth and fifth graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

The Purposes of Cub Scouting

Cub Scouting has nine purposes, to:

  • Positively influence character development and encourage spiritual growth
  • Help boys develop habits and attitudes of good citizenship
  • Encourage good sportsmanship and pride in growing strong in mind and body
  • Improve understanding within the family
  • Strengthen boys' ability to get along with other boys and respect other people
  • Foster a sense of personal achievement by helping boys develop new interests and skills
  • Show how to be helpful and do one's best
  • Provide fun and exciting new things to do
  • Prepare boys to become Boy Scouts

The Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
And to obey the Scout Law,
To help other people at all times
To keep myself physically strong,
Mentally awake, and morally straight

The Scout Law

A Scout is:
Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
and Reverent

CLICK HERE to find a Cub Pack near you!

What Is Boy Scouts?

Lord Robert Baden-Powell began Scouting in Great Britain in 1907 and was immediately successful in attracting boys and adult leaders to its adventurous and fun outdoor program. In addition to teaching boys outdoor skills and teamwork, boys learned responsibility, character, and the need to do good for others. Several years later, in 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship and personnel fitness training for youth. Over 100 years later, Scouting is one of the largest youth organizations in the world.

Membership

The Boy Scout program is for boys ages 11-17. Members join a Boy Scout Troop and are assigned to a patrol, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys, similar to a Cub Scout Den. Troops and their patrols meet weekly, practicing skills, playing games, and learning to plan and manage for themselves as the boys help organize outings, such as hikes, campouts, and outdoor trips, and other activities.

The role of the Scoutmaster and his staff of adult leaders is to coach the boys in developing leadership skills, thinking through problems and tasks, and learning how to work and play together as a team. The Troop Committee includes parents of boys in the Troop and members of the chartered organization.

The Purposes of Boy Scouting

Specifically, the BSA endeavors to help boys develop into American citizens who:

  • Are physically, mentally and emotionally fit
  • Have high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage and resourcefulness
  • Have personal values based on religious concepts
  • Have the desire and skills to help others
  • Understand the principle of the American social, economic and governmental systems
  • Are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation's role in the world
  • Have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people
  • Are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.

Personal Growth

As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting's aims.

The Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
And to obey the Scout Law,
To help other people at all times
To keep myself physically strong,
Mentally awake, and morally straight

The Scout Law

A Scout is:
Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
and Reverent

The Boy Scout Motto

Be Prepared

The Boy Scout Slogan

Do a Good Turn Daily

Scouting Memories

Long after a young man matures and grows into adulthood, the imprint of Scouting and what he learned and experienced in the program will stay with him. There are tons of stories about how Eagle Scouts frequently can be found in positions of leadership in their communities, churches, companies, and even in military service. But the fact of the matter is that even if a boy only gets as far as Tenderfoot, years later he will more than likely remember the Scout oath and the words "On my honor...", remember the name of the summer camp he went to, and the names of his patrol mates - even when he can't remember the date of his own wedding anniversary. Scouting soaks into the very core of the people who get involved in it because it gives meaning to Honor, Friendship, Trust, Faith, and all the other things that form us and sustain us as individuals. So even when a man stands hunched over his cane and his knurled fingers have to be willed to form the Scout sign, it's no surprise that many will say with a choked voice of pride packed with memories, "I remember...". And we're all better for it.

CLICK HERE to find a Scout Troop near you!

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