Two Mountains District
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RECHARTERING IN 7 SIMPLE STEPS !

STEP 1 - Pick-up Your Charter Renewal Packet

  • Pick-up your Charter Renewal Packet at one of the Following Locations on NOVEMBER 5:
    • ​Dan Beard District - Council Service and Training Center, Moosic
    • Two Mountains District - St. Nicholas R.C. Church, Wilkes Barre - 6:00 - 8:00 pm
  • If you can't pick up your charter on Nov 5, make arrangements to have your Unit Commissioner pick it up, or you can pick it up the Council Service and Training Center as soon as possible after Nov 5
  • Extra copies of the basic charter renewal packets are available at the following links:

STEP 2 - Make an Appointment to Review & Turn in Your Charter

  • Contact your District Executive to schedule an appointment to review & turn-in your charter on one of the following dates:
    • Saturday, November 22nd and December 6th from 9am – 12pm at the Council Service Center
    • Tuesday, December 2nd and December 9th from 5pm – 7pm at the Council Service Center
    • Thursday, December 4th and December 11th from 5pm – 7pm at the Council Service Center

STEP 3 - Schedule & Hold a Unit Rechartering Team Meeting

  • Set a date to meet that is convenient for your re-charter team after receiving the Charter Renewal packet.
  • Suggested attendance: Your Unit Commissioner, Charter Renewal Chairman, Unit Leader, Unit Committee Chair, Treasurer, and other interested adults.
  • Consider inviting youth leaders of older youth programs (e.g., Senior Patrol Leader or Crew President).
  • Obtain current unit rosters from unit leadership and compare to the unit roster that has been provided.
  • Write unit roster changes in pencil, not ink, so that mistakes can be erased.
  • Extra youth and adult applications are in your kit. If you need more, contact your District Executive or visit the Council Service and Training Center in Moosic
  • Have telephone access to be able to call your families for status on their registration.
  • If you need assistance, your Unit Commissioner has resources to help with your charter renewal.

STEP 4 - Complete All Necessary Paperwork & Collect (new) Applications & Fees

  • Complete all forms in charter renewal packet
  • Collect & make sure all new member applications all complete, including the appropriate signatures.Extra youth and adult applications are in your kit. If you need more, contact your District Executive or visit the Council Service and Training Center.
  • Fee information is also listed in the packet

STEP 5 - Revise the Charter

  • Follow the steps in the Recharteering Packet to complete the re-charter process.
  • You can save a lot of time and help insure your charter is accurate by updating your charter ONLINE via the Internet at http:/www.scoutnet.scouting.org/UCRS/ui/home/default.aspx.
  • Internet Rechartering allows you to renew your unit's charter online and perform the following actions:
    • Select members from your existing charter roster
    • Promote members from another unit
    • Add new members
    • Update member information
    • Print a summary of costs associated with the new charter.
    • Connect to a printer and print the final copy of the charter report for signature

  • Or revise the charter manually via the steps outlined in the Packet

STEP 6 - Gather Final Documents & Signatures

  • Review and make sure that all Charter Renewal Checklist items are complete on the Charter Worksheet in the Packet
  • Collect all items listed on Worksheet

STEP 7 - Bring All Completed Forms & Payment to Scheduled Appointment at the Scout Service and Training Center (Step 2, above)

  • Completed charter paperwork and payments are due in to the Scout Service and Training Center on or before DECEMBER 15th.
  • Remember, each unit needs to meet with their unit commissioner to conduct the unit membership inventory and charter renewal meeting prior to the final appointment.
  • Remember that All paperwork needs to be signed by the Executive Officer and Unit Leader.
  • Bring requirement payment. It is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED that, if paying by check, the amount not be filled in on the check until the appointment in case of any errors discovered during the final review.

All members of Lowwapaneu Lodge, family members and friends are invited to attend the Annual Holiday Banquet.  This year's activity of cheerful fellowship will be on Sunday, December 28 at the Al Mia Amore Restaurant (formerly The After Five), 280 Main St, Dickson City.  The afternoon's festivities begin with a gathering at 1:00 pm, followed by dinner at 1:30 pm.

Highlights of this year’s banquet include: recognition of the new Ordeal, Brotherhood, and Vigil members; special guests; entertainment; lodge plans for the upcoming year; fellowship; James West and Founder’s Award presentations... and more.

Cost: $25. per person if paid by Dec 20th.  $30 after Dec 20th. LAST DAY for reservations is Dec 23!

Eagle Scout Advancement Tools

Resources that our council has made available for Life Scouts on their "Trail to Eagle" are available at the link below.

 

What Is Cub Scouts?

In 1930 the Boy Scouts of America launched a home- and neighborhood-centered program for boys 9 to 11 years of age. A key element of the program is an emphasis on caring, nurturing relationships between boys and their parents, adult leaders, and friends. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA's three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

Membership

Cub Scouting has program components for boys in the first through fifth grades (or ages 7, 8, 9, or 10). Members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. First-grade boys (Tiger Cubs) meet twice a month, while Wolf Cub Scouts (second graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third graders), and Webelos (fourth and fifth graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

The Purposes of Cub Scouting

Cub Scouting has nine purposes, to:

  • Positively influence character development and encourage spiritual growth
  • Help boys develop habits and attitudes of good citizenship
  • Encourage good sportsmanship and pride in growing strong in mind and body
  • Improve understanding within the family
  • Strengthen boys' ability to get along with other boys and respect other people
  • Foster a sense of personal achievement by helping boys develop new interests and skills
  • Show how to be helpful and do one's best
  • Provide fun and exciting new things to do
  • Prepare boys to become Boy Scouts

The Cub Scout Promise

I, (name), promise to do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
To help other people, and
To obey the Law of the Pack.
The Cub Scout Motto
Do Your Best.

The Law of the Pack

The Cub Scout follows Akela.
The Cub Scout helps the pack go.
The pack helps the Cub Scout grow.
The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Cub Scout Colors

The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold. The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness. Together, they symbolize what Cub Scouting is all about.

CLICK HERE to find a Cub Pack near you!

We wish to thank these Companies, Foundations and Authorities for their generous contributions to the Dan Beard Cabin Project.

Woodloch Lackawanna Heritage Valley

The Ross Family Foundation Fast Signs

Cabin Doctor Corcoran Printing

Parry Express Winloa Auto & Equipment

Pennstar North Penn Bank

Hemmler & Camayd Architects H.K. Jones & Son

Grand Rental Station Simplex Homes

Paupack Fuel Oil The Dime Bank

 

CubCast - January 2013

January 2013 - Working With Core Values/Monthly Themes and Your District Roundtable

As a den leader or pack committee member, are you confused by many different monthly Core Values and themes? Look for help at your roundtable, but what’s a roundtable? Well, be confused no more as Assistant Council Commissioner Cheri Pepka of the Chief Seattle Council explains implementing the Core Values and monthly themes fun and the joys of participating in roundtable.

{audio}http://www.scouting.org/filestore/scoutcast/cubcast/201301_1/audio.mp3{/audio}

All CubCast Episodes

ScoutCast - January 2013

January 2013 - How to Handle Bullying in the Troop

Welcome to the new ScoutCast for Scout leaders and parents! This series of monthly podcasts is designed to bring you topics that you might not feel comfortable talking about at roundtable meetings (but should). Perhaps these episodes will give you talking points for your meeting.

So please join hosts J.D. Owen, editor-in-chief of Boys’ Life and Scouting magazines; Paula Murphey, senior editor of Boys’ Life; and our very special guest for this first Scoutcast, New York Times best-selling author of 26 books, including The Wonder of Boys and Leadership and the Sexes, Michael Gurian as they discuss the best ways to handle bullying in your troop.

{audio}http://www.scouting.org/filestore/scoutcast/resources/201301_1/audio.mp3{/audio}

All ScoutCast Episodes

Click on the links below for more information on Cub Scout & Webelos STEM/Nova Program

BSA Cub Scout Nova & Supernova Awards Website

BSA Webelos Supernova Award Website

Cub Scout Nova Guidebook guidebooks may be purchased in the Council Scout Shop
or ordered online via Scoutstuff.org..

STEM/Nova Tracking Forms

Click on the links below to download a tracking form for a Nova or Supernova award

Science Everywhere tracking form

Tech Talk tracking form

Swing! tracking form

1-2-3 Go tracking form

Dr. Luis W. Alvarez Supernova Award tracking form

Dr. Charles H. Townes Supernova Award tracking form

Cub Scout & Webelos STEM/Nova Related Awards

Below is a list of tiered requirements for Cub Scout belt loops / pins, and Webelos activity badges.
Tier 1 includes badges, belt loops, and pins that are STEM related in their entirety, whereas Tier 2 includes badges, belt loops, and pins that may have only a few STEM-related requirements.

Cub Scout Academic and Sports Belt Loops and Pins (Tier 1)

Astronomy Computers Fishing Geology Horseback Riding
Mathematics Photography Science Weather Wildlife Conservation

Cub Scout Academic and Sports Belt Loops and Pins (Tier 2)

Archery Baseball BB Gun Shooting Bowling Collecting
Golf Family Travel Hiking Map & Compass  

Webelos Activity Pins (Tier 1)

Communicator Engineer Forester
Geologist Naturalist Scientist

Webelos Activity Pins (Tier 2)

Family Member Outdoorsman Scholar Traveler

Other Resources

Den Leaders looking for some program ideas around science for their Cub Scouts' advancement trail may find some helpful resources in this document:

Cub Scout Science Ideas

The Camp Headquarters Cabin and Dan Beards Outdoor School
Lackawaxen Township, Pike County, PA

Wildlands and Dan BeardPreserving this cabin, this piece of history has significant meaning not only to the early beginnings of the Boy Scouts of American, but to Daniel Carter Beard and his association with the Northeastern Pennsylvania region. His original summer home, Wildlands, burned down in 1961. The other buildings of the Dan Beard Outdoor School for Boys no longer exist or have been moved. That makes this Kiva style log cabin the last remaining part of Beard's Outdoor School. Relocating and keeping the cabin in the NEPA region is important to preserving not only this history but it is also a tribute to a beloved founder of the BSA, Dan Beard himself.

In 1887, Daniel Carter Beard and his brother James first purchased property on Lake Teedyuskung in Lackawaxen Twp, Pike County, PA. The property was eventually deeded in full to Dan Beard. He built a log cabin in 1887 known as Wildlands as a summer home. In 1916 The Dan Beard Outdoor School for Boys was incorporated and the summer camp program began to take shape.

Dan Beard met Abner McPheters at an outdoor conference and designs for an additional log cabin on his property in Lackawaxen Twp, were formulated. Abner McPheters was a outdoor guide, lumber operations manager, and cabin builder from Maine. A deal was struck and McPheters came from Maine with five loggers (two are known at this time as Little Joe and Elmer) to construct the Kiva style cabin in 1926. The cabin was built on the East side of Welcome Lake Road which is now owned by Woodloch Pines. The purpose of building a Kiva style cabin is that it is well suited to be used as a large assembly room. This Camp Headquarters cabin was designed for that purpose. It is a 28' x 30' rectangular log building with walls reaching to the steeply pitched roof. Joists were placed during the construction (see photo) on the top of wall girders in a N-S orientation to accommodate a hanging room known as the Orioles Nest, which was placed at right angles in a East West direction.

This nest was constructed to float on the rafters so as not to take away from the rooms spacious appearance. The floor of the second level is locked into place by a king post that runs from the roof’s ridgepole to the second floor joist and held in place by wooden pegs. It was effective in reducing vibration and springing of the floor. Stairs were built on the NW side of the room leading to the Orioles Nest. The loft is surrounded with a “U” shaped balcony referred to as a “Romeo and Juliet” balcony.

An extension with a lean-to style roof is located on the east side of the cabin and contains 4 small rooms to be used as bedrooms and offices. The desire was to maintain focus on the cabins’ use as an assembly room. A porch extends from the NW side and continues to the South side of the cabin. A stone fireplace with a puncheon mantel was constructed on the east side of the assembly room. To build it, they first constructed a open face wooden box to be used as a form for laying the stones. Once the stones were laid and chimney finished, a fire was set burning the wooden form from the fireplace.

The front door of the cabin was referred to as a “Fort Pitt” door. It was constructed by using small tree trunks with one side flattened (puncheons.) Each puncheon was attached together to make 2 panels. A frame was constructed and the panels attached to each side. These panel seams were offset and covered on the insides sealing the seams to reduce air seepage. The outside panel overlapped the frame to complete the seal when the door was closed. One of the Maine Loggers, Little Joe, forged the metal hinges in Hawley at a blacksmith shop and hand carved the latches and handles for the door.

 

What Is Boy Scouts?

Lord Robert Baden-Powell began Scouting in Great Britain in 1907 and was immediately successful in attracting boys and adult leaders to its adventurous and fun outdoor program. In addition to teaching boys outdoor skills and teamwork, boys learned responsibility, character, and the need to do good for others. Several years later, in 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship and personnel fitness training for youth. Over 100 years later, Scouting is one of the largest youth organizations in the world.

Membership

The Boy Scout program is for boys ages 11-17. Members join a Boy Scout Troop and are assigned to a patrol, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys, similar to a Cub Scout Den. Troops and their patrols meet weekly, practicing skills, playing games, and learning to plan and manage for themselves as the boys help organize outings, such as hikes, campouts, and outdoor trips, and other activities.

The role of the Scoutmaster and his staff of adult leaders is to coach the boys in developing leadership skills, thinking through problems and tasks, and learning how to work and play together as a team. The Troop Committee includes parents of boys in the Troop and members of the chartered organization.

The Purposes of Boy Scouting

Specifically, the BSA endeavors to help boys develop into American citizens who:

  • Are physically, mentally and emotionally fit
  • Have high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage and resourcefulness
  • Have personal values based on religious concepts
  • Have the desire and skills to help others
  • Understand the principle of the American social, economic and governmental systems
  • Are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation's role in the world
  • Have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people
  • Are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.

Personal Growth

As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting's aims.

The Boy Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
And to obey the Scout Law,
To help other people at all times
To keep myself physically strong,
Mentally awake, and morally straight

The Boy Scout Motto

Be Prepared

The Scout Law

A Scout is:
Trustworthy
Loyal
Helpful
Friendly
Courteous
Kind
Obedient
Cheerful
Thrifty
Brave
Clean
and Reverent

Scouting Memories

Long after a young man matures and grows into adulthood, the imprint of Scouting and what he learned and experienced in the program will stay with him. There are tons of stories about how Eagle Scouts frequently can be found in positions of leadership in their communities, churches, companies, and even in military service. But the fact of the matter is that even if a boy only gets as far as Tenderfoot, years later he will more than likely remember the Scout oath and the words "On my honor...", remember the name of the summer camp he went to, and the names of his patrol mates - even when he can't remember the date of his own wedding anniversary. Scouting soaks into the very core of the people who get involved in it because it gives meaning to Honor, Friendship, Trust, Faith, and all the other things that form us and sustain us as individuals. So even when a man stands hunched over his cane and his knurled fingers have to be willed to form the Scout sign, it's no surprise that many will say with a choked voice of pride packed with memories, "I remember...". And we're all better for it.

CLICK HERE to find a Scout Troop near you!

Upcoming Events

Dec
24

12/24/2014 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

Jan
7

01/07/2015 6:45 pm - 8:30 pm

Jan
11

01/11/2015 12:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Jan
12

01/12/2015 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Jan
14

01/14/2015 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm