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What Is Cub Scouts?

In 1930 the Boy Scouts of America launched a home- and neighborhood-centered program for boys 9 to 11 years of age. A key element of the program is an emphasis on caring, nurturing relationships between boys and their parents, adult leaders, and friends. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA's three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

Membership

Cub Scouting has program components for boys in the first through fifth grades (or ages 7, 8, 9, or 10). Members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. First-grade boys (Tiger Cubs) meet twice a month, while Wolf Cub Scouts (second graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third graders), and Webelos (fourth and fifth graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

The Purposes of Cub Scouting

Cub Scouting has nine purposes, to:

  • Positively influence character development and encourage spiritual growth
  • Help boys develop habits and attitudes of good citizenship
  • Encourage good sportsmanship and pride in growing strong in mind and body
  • Improve understanding within the family
  • Strengthen boys' ability to get along with other boys and respect other people
  • Foster a sense of personal achievement by helping boys develop new interests and skills
  • Show how to be helpful and do one's best
  • Provide fun and exciting new things to do
  • Prepare boys to become Boy Scouts

The Cub Scout Promise

I, (name), promise to do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
To help other people, and
To obey the Law of the Pack.
The Cub Scout Motto
Do Your Best.

The Law of the Pack

The Cub Scout follows Akela.
The Cub Scout helps the pack go.
The pack helps the Cub Scout grow.
The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Cub Scout Colors

The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold. The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness. Together, they symbolize what Cub Scouting is all about.

CLICK HERE to find a Cub Pack near you!

Venturing in Northeastern Pennsylvania

What Is Venturing?

Venturing is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth, adult leaders, and organizations in their communities. Local community organizations establish a Venturing crew by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of exciting and meaningful activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, to grow, to develop leadership skills, and to become good citizens.

Venturing crews can specialize in a variety of avocation or hobby interests. Venturing programs are developed around six experience areas of emphasis: Citizenship; Leadership; Fitness; Social; Outdoor; Service.

Membership

Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age.

Venturing's purpose is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults.

The Purposes of Venturing

Young adults involved in Venturing will:

  • Learn to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling the values in the Venturing Oath and Code
  • Experience a program that is fun and full of challenge and adventure
  • Become a skilled training and program resource for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and other groups
  • Acquire skills in the areas of high adventure, sports, arts and hobbies, youth ministries, or Sea Scouting
  • Experience positive leadership from adult and youth leaders and be given opportunities to take on leadership roles
  • Have a chance to learn and grow in a supportive, caring, and fun environment.

Personal Growth

The methods of Venturing have been carefully chosen to meet the needs of young adults and help them grow into adulthood with confidence and fully developed interpersonal skills that can help them throughout their lifetime. These methods are:

  • Voluntary association between youth and adults. Because Venturing is voluntary, youth are receptive to new ideas, experiences, and relationships. For the youth members, these relationships provide a connection to new ways of thinking and acting, and a new identity as a responsible young adult.
  • Ethical decision-making. By asking young people to be responsible for themselves, for a program of positive activities and experiences, and for other people, Venturing provides numerous opportunities for making decisions and ethical choices. With the influence of positive adult role models and structured activities, youth learn to make effective and ethical decisions.
  • Group activities. Venturing activities are interdependent group experiences in which success is dependent on the cooperation of all youth and adults.
  • Recognition of achievement. Recognition might come through the achievement of one of the many awards available to youth members, but peers and adults also achieve it through the acknowledgement of a young person's competence and abilities.
  • Democratic process. Venturing crews provide exposure to democratic ideas and skills that are needed throughout life.
  • Curiosity, exploration, and adventure. New experiences and Venturing activities provide an excellent opportunity for acquiring new skills and participating in action-oriented activities.

The Venturing Oath

As a Venturer,
I promise to do my duty to God
and help strengthen America,
to help others, and to seek truth, fairness,
and adventure in our world.

The Venturing Code

As a Venturer, I believe that America's strength lies in our trust in God and in the courage, strength, and traditions of our people. I will, therefore, be faithful in my religious duties and will maintain a personal sense of honor in my own life. I will treasure my American heritage and will do all I can to preserve and enrich it. I will recognize the dignity and worth of all humanity and will use fair play and goodwill in my daily life.; I will acquire the Venturing attitude that seeks truth in all things and adventure on the frontiers of our changing world.

The Outdoor Code

As an American, I will do my best to -

  • Be clean in my outdoor manners.
    I will treat the outdoors as a heritage.
    I will take care of it for myself and others
    I will keep my trash and garbage out of lakes, streams, fields, woods, and roadways.
  • Be careful with fire.
    I will prevent wildfire.
    I will build my fires only where they are appropriate.
    When I have finished using a fire, I will make sure it is cold out.
    I will leave a clean fire ring, or remove all evidence of my fire.
  • Be considerate in the outdoors.
    I will treat public and private property with respect.
    I will use low-impact methods of hiking and camping.

and

  • Be conservation minded
    I will learn how to practice good conservation of soil, waters, forests, minerals, grasslands, wildlife, and energy.
    I will urge others to do the same.

CLICK HERE to find a Venturing Crew near you!

Learning for Life and Exploring in Northeastern Pennsylvania

What Is Learning for Life?

Learning for Life offers classroom-based programs that provide an action-learning process with grade-specific lesson plans for grades K through 12, plus a complete supplement for special-needs students.

Learning for Life helps youth develop social and life skills, assist in character development, and helps them formulate positive personal values.

What Is Exploring?

Exploring is a worksite-based program that gives youth an opportunity to visit community organizations and explore the dynamics of various careers.

Exploring's purpose is to provide experiences that help young people mature and to help them to become responsible and caring adults.

Click here to learn more about the Learning for Life and Exploring programs

For almost 100 years, Scouting programs have instilled in youth the values found in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Today, these values are just as relevant in helping youth grow to their full potential as they were in 1910. Scouting helps youth develop academic skills, self-confidence, ethics, leadership skills, and citizenship skills that influence their adult lives.

The Boy Scouts of America provides youth with programs and activities that allow them to

  • Try new things
  • Provide service to others
  • Build self-confidence
  • Reinforce ethical standards.

While various activities and youth groups teach basic skills and promote teamwork, Scouting goes beyond that and encourages youth to achieve a deeper appreciation for service to others in their community.

Scouting provides youth with a sense that they are important as individuals. It is communicated to them that those in the Scouting family care about what happens to them, regardless of whether a game is won or lost.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, Scouting promotes activities that lead to personal responsibility and high self-esteem. As a result, when hard decisions have to be made, peer pressure can be resisted and the right choices can be made.

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Since its founding in 1910, the Boy Scouts of America has had fully participating members with physical, mental, and emotional disabilities. James E. West, the first Chief Scout Executive, was a person with a disability. Although most of the BSA's efforts have been directed at keeping such boys in the mainstream of Scouting, it has also recognized the special needs of those with significant disabilities. To find out more about advancement for Scouts with Special Needs, click on the "Read more" link, below.

From time to time, area vendors will offer opportunities for you to support Scouting with things you may buy or use everyday.  Below are some current offers from area vendors who want to help support Scouting in Northeastern Pennsylvania.


The Order of the Arrow (OA) was founded by Dr. E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson in 1915 at the Treasure Island Camp of the Philadelphia Council, Boy Scouts of America. It became an official program experiment in 1922 and was approved as part of the Scouting program in 1934. In 1948, the OA was recognized as the BSA's national brotherhood of honor campers and became an official part of the national camping program of the Boy Scouts of America. Today, the OA is recognized as Scouting's National Honor Society.

191 flap Lowwapaneu Lodge #191 is the Order of the Arrow lodge of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Council. Formed by the merger of Amad 'ahi Lodge #542 and Acahela Lodge #223 when the Forest Lakes Council and Penn Mountains Council merged.

 

CLICK HERE for more information on Lowwapaneu Lodge 191