Council
Merit Badge Class Listing - 2015
Difficulty rankings are on a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the most challenging.
Merit Badge Difficulty Class Length Session(s)
Architecture 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Chemistry 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Chess 2 4 hours 2 pm - 6 pm
Citizenship in the Community 5 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Citizenship in the Nation 5 6 hours 9 am - 4 pm
Citizenship in the World 5 6 hours 9 am - 4 pm
Digital Technology 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Disabilities Awareness 2 2 hours 2 pm - 4 pm; 4 pm - 6 pm
Electricity* 3 4 hours 2 pm - 6 pm
Electronics * (limit 12/class) 4 4 hours 2 pm - 6 pm
Emergency Preparedness 4 6 hours 9 am - 4 pm
Engineering * 4 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Fingerprinting 1 2 hours 9 am - 11 am; 11 am - 1 pm; 2 pm - 4 pm; 4 pm - 6 pm
Game Design (limit 12/class) 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Graphic Arts (limit 10/class) 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Indian Lore 3 2 hours 11 am - 1 pm; 2 pm - 4 pm; 4 pm - 6 pm
Inventing 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Law 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Lifesaving 5 8 hours 9 am - 6 pm
Medicine (limit 12/class) 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Metalwork ** (limit 12/class) 2 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm; 2 pm - 6 pm
Mining in Society 4 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm
Moviemaking (limit 10/class) 3 6 hours 9 am - 4 pm
Personal Management 5 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm; 2 pm - 6 pm
Programming 4 4 hours 2 pm - 6 pm
Radio 3 2 hours 2 pm - 4 pm
Railroading** (limit 12/class) 3 6 hours 9 am - 4 pm
Robotics* (limit 8+/class) 5 6 hours 9 am - 4 pm
Scholarship 1 2 hours 9 am - 11 am; 11 am - 1 pm; 2 pm - 4 pm; 4 pm - 6 pm
Scouting Heritage 3 4 hours 2 pm - 6 pm
Sports 1 2 hours 2 pm - 4 pm; 4 pm - 6 pm
Swimming 4 6 hours 11 am - 6 pm
Veterinary Medicine (limit 12/class) 3 4 hours 2 pm - 6 pm
Welding ** (limit 12/class) 3 4 hours 9 am - 1 pm; 2 pm - 6 pm

 

* Requires an additional $20.00 Lab Fee
** Requires an additional $10.00 Lab Fee

We reserve the right to limit registration for Merit Badge College or for any course. We also reserve the right to cancel a course or activities as needed. In case any course must be closed or limited, Scouts will be admitted on a first registered and paid, first served basis. Registration fees are non-refundable after December 17, 2014.

Merit Badge College Pre-Registration Form

Registration for Merit Badge College is now CLOSED.  For more information on Merit Badge College please call the Scout Service and Training Center at 570-207-1227.

List of Requirements for Merit Badges to be offered

  • Requirements formatted like this MUST be completed prior to Merit Badge College! All written requirements must be typed.
  • Please note that for all Merit Badges being completed at Merit Badge College, you must follow the requirements as stated below
  • Some badges require travel off the King’s College Campus to other nearby venues to complete requirements.
  • There is a Word document (*.doc file) available for download that incliudes the requirements for each merit badge offered. You are encouraged to download for your reference.  Some badges require that you complete and email your prerequisite work before Merit Badge College on January 7th. See the IMPORTANT NOTICE at the right.
  • Important: Scoutmaster’s signature is mandatory in order to ensure that the Scoutmaster has approved the Scout to attempt these Merit Badges. Unsigned forms will be return unprocessed.
  • Requirements are taken from the 2014 BSA Requirements Book

 

Architecture

Architecture Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. In written form, do the following:

    1. Tour your community and list in writing the different types of buildings you see. Try to identify buildings that can be associated with a specific period of history or style of architecture. Make a sketch of the building you most admire.

    2. Select an architectural achievement that has had a major impact on society. Using resources such as the Internet (with your parent’s permission), books, and magazines, find our how this achievement has influenced the world today. Report in writing what you learned.

  2. In the Outdoor Code, a Scout pledges to “be conservation-minded.” Discuss the following with your counselor:
    1. The term sustainable architecture. Identify three features typical of green buildings.
    2. The difference between renewable building materials and recycled building materials, and how each can be used in construction.
    3. The relationship of architecture with its surrounding environment and the community.
    4. How entire buildings can be reused rather than torn down when they no longer serve their original purpose.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. With your parent’s and counselor’s permission and approval, arrange to meet with an architect. Ask to see the scale model of a building and the drawings that a builder would use to construct this building. Discuss why the different building materials were selected. Look at the details in the drawings and the model to see how the materials and components are attached to each other during construction.
    2. With your parent’s and counselor’s permission and approval, arrange to meet with an architect at a construction site. Ask the architect to bring drawings that the builder uses to construct the building. While at the site, discuss why the different building materials being used were selected. Discuss how the different building materials and components are attached to each other during construction.
      NOTE: To visit a construction site will require advance planning, You will need permission from your parents, counselor, the architect, and the construction site manager. A construction site is a very dangerous place. While there, you will need to closely follow the site manager’s directions and comply with all the safety procedures, including wearing a hard hat, protective eyewear, and proper footwear.
    3. Interview someone who might be your client (such as a prospective homeowner or business owner) if you were an architect. Find out what your client’s requirements would be for designing a new home or business building. Write a short program including a list of requirements for the project, the functions of the building and site, how the functions relate to one another, and the goals of the project.
  4. Measure a room such as one where you live or where your troop meets. Make an accurately scaled drawing of the room’s floor plan showing walls, doors, closets, windows, and any built-in furniture or cabinets. Neatly label your drawing with the following: your name, the date, what room you drew, and the scale of the drawing and bring to Merit Badge College. (Drawing scale: ¼ inch = 1 foot)

  5. Find out about three career opportunities in architecture. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Report in writing what you learned, and include an explanation of why this profession might interest you.

 

Chemistry

Chemistry Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Submit in writing each of the following:

    1. Describe three examples of safety equipment used in a chemistry laboratory and the reason each one is used.

    2. Describe what a material safety data sheet (MSDS) is and tell why it is used.

    3. Obtain an MSDS for both a paint and and insecticide. Compare and discuss the toxicity, disposal, and safe-handling sections for these two common household products.

    4. Discuss the safe storage of chemicals. How does the safe storage of chemicals apply to your home, your school, your community, and the environment?

  2. Do EACH of the following:

    1. Predict what would happen if you placed an iron nail in a copper sulfate solution. Then, put an iron nail in a copper sulfate solution. Describe your observations and make a conclusion based on your observations. Compare your prediction and original conclusion with what actually happened. Write the formula for the reaction that you described.
    2. Describe in writing how you would separate sand from water, table salt from water, oil from water, and gasoline from motor oil. Name the practical processes that require these kinds of separations.

    3. Describe in writing the difference between a chemical reaction and a physical change.

  3. Construct a Cartesian diver. Describe its function in terms of how gases in general behave under different pressures and different temperatures. Describe how the behavior of gases affects a back-packer at high altitudes and a scuba diver underwater.

  4. Do EACH of the following:

    1. Cut a round onion into small chunks. Separate the onion chunks into three equal portions. Leave the first portion raw. Cook the second portion of onion chunks until the pieces are translucent. Cook the third portion until the onions are caramelized, or brown in color. Taste each type of onion. Describe the taste of raw onion versus partially cooked onion versus caramalized onion. Explain what happens to molecules in the onion during the cooking process.
    2. Describe the chemical similarities and differences between toothpaste and an abrasive household cleanser. Explain how the end use or purpose of a product affects its chemical formulation.

    3. In a clear container, mix a half-cup of water with a tablespoon of oil. Explain why the oil and water do not mix. Find a substance that will help the two combine, and add it to the mixture. Describe what happened, and explain how that substance worked to combine the oil and water.
  5. List in writing the four classical divisions of chemistry. Briefly describe each one, and tell how it applies to your everyday life.

  6. Submit each of the following in writing:

    1. Name two government agencies that are responsible for tracking the use of chemicals for commercial or industrial use. Pick one agency and briefly describe its responsibilites to the public and the environment.

    2. Define pollution. Explain the chemical effects of ozone, global warming, and acid rain. Pick a current environmental problem as an example. Briefly describe what people are doing to resolve this hazard and to increase understanding of the problem.

    3. Using reasons from chemistry, describe the effect on the environment of ONE of the following:

      1. The production of aluminum cans or plastic milk cartons

      2. Sulfur from burning coal

      3. Used motor oil

      4. Newspaper

    4. Briefly describe the purpose of phosphates in fertilizer and in laundry detergent. Explain how the use of phosphates in fertilizer affects the environment. Also, explain why phosphates have been removed from laundry detergents.

  7. Do the following:
    1. Visit a laboratory and talk to a practicing chemist. Ask what the chemist does and what training and education are needed to work as a chemist.
Chess

Chess
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Read about and be prepared to discuss with your merit badge counselor the history of the game of chess. Know and explain why it is considered a game of planning and strategy.
  2. Prepare in writing to turn in and discuss with your merit badge counselor the following:
    1. The benefits of playing chess, including developing critical thinking skills, concentration skills, and decision-making skills, and how these skills can help you in other areas of your life
    2. Sportsmanship and chess etiquette
  3. Demonstrate to your counselor that you know each of the following. Then, using Scouting’s Teaching EDGE, prepare written notes to teach the following to a Scout who does not know how to play chess:
    1. The name of each chess piece
    2. How to set up a chessboard
    3. How each chess piece moves, including castling and en passant captures
  4. Do the following (by preparing in writing – a, b, c & d only):
    1. Demonstrate scorekeeping using the algebraic system of chess notation.
    2. Discuss the differences between the opening, the middle game, and the endgame.
    3. Explain four opening principles.
    4. Explain the four rules for castling.
    5. On a chessboard, demonstrate a “scholar’s mate” and a “fool’s mate.”
    6. Demonstrate on a chessboard four ways a chess game can end in a draw.
  5. Do the following (by preparing in writing – a & b only):
    1. Explain four of the following elements of chess strategy: exploiting weaknesses, force, king safety, pawn structure, space, tempo, time.
    2. Explain any five of these chess tactics: clearance sacrifice, decoy, discovered attack, double attack, fork, interposing, overloading, overprotecting, pin, remove the defender, skewer, zwischenzug.
    3. Set up a chessboard with the white king on e1, the white rooks on a1 and h1, and the black king on e5. With White to move first, demonstrate how to force checkmate on the black king.
    4. Set up and solve five direct-mate problems provided by your merit badge counselor.
  6. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Play at least three games of chess with other Scouts and/or your merit badge counselor. Replay the games from your score sheets and discuss with your counselor how you might have played each game differently.
    2. Play in a scholastic (youth) chess tournament and use your score sheets from that tournament to replay your games with your merit badge counselor. Discuss with your counselor how you might have played each game differently.
    3. Organize and run a chess tournament with at least four players, plus you. Have each competitor play at least two games.

 

Citizenship in the Community

Citizenship in the Community
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Discuss with your counselor what citizenship in the community means and what it takes to be a good citizen in your community. Discuss the rights, duties, and obligations of citizenship, and explain how you can demonstrate good citizenship in your community, Scouting unit, place of worship, or school.
  2. Do the following and bring to Merit Badge College:
    1. On a map of your community, locate and point out the following:
      1. Chief government buildings such as your city hall, county courthouse, and public works/services facility
      2. Fire station, police station, and hospital nearest your home
      3. Historical or other interesting points (
    2. Chart the organization of your local or state government. Show the top offices and tell whether they are elected or appointed.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Attend a meeting of your city, town, or county council or school board; OR attend a municipal, county, or state court session. Bring Scoutmaster verification of your visit. (Please note: the viewing of a council meeting on TV does not fulfill this requirement.)
    2. Choose one of the issues discussed at the meeting where a difference of opinions was expressed, and explain in writing why you agree with one opinion more than you do another one.
  4. Choose an issue that is important to the citizens of your community; then do the following:
    1. Find out which branch of local government is responsible for this issue.
    2. With your parent’s approval, interview one person from the branch of government you identified in requirement 4a. Ask what is being done about this issue and how young people can help.
    3. Report in writing what you have learned.
  5. With the approval of your parent, watch one of the movies listed below that shows how the actions of one individual or group of individuals can have a positive effect on a community. Explain in writing what you learned from the movie about what it means to be a valuable and concerned member of the community.
    Movie choices: Follow Me Boys, Hoosiers, October Sky, Mr. Holland’s Opus, Remember the Titans
  6. List some of the services (such as the library, recreation center, public transportation, and public safety) your community provides that are funded by taxpayers. Tell your counselor why these services are important to your community.
  7. Do the following:
    1. Choose a charitable organization outside of Scouting that interests you and brings people in your community together to work for the good of your community.
    2. Using a variety of resources (including newspapers, fliers and other literature, the Internet [with your parent’s permission], volunteers, and employees of the organization), find out more about this organization.
    3. With you parent’s approval, contact the organization and find out what young people can do to help. While working on this merit badge, volunteer at least eight hours of your time for the organization. Bring Scoutmaster verification of your volunteer hours to Merit Badge College. After your volunteer experience is over, explain in writing what you have learned.
  8. Develop a public presentation (such as a video, slide show, speech, digital presentation, or photo exhibit) about important and unique aspects of your community. Include information about the history, cultures, and ethnic groups of your community; its best features and popular places where people gather; and the challenges it faces. Stage your presentation in front of your merit badge counselor. Be prepared to hand in to your merit badge counselor a copy of your presentation in the form of a video, CD or disc, or written report or presentation.
Citizenship in the Nation

Citizenship in the Nation
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. 1. Explain what citizenship in the nation means and what it takes to be a good citizen of this country. Discuss the rights, duties, and obligations of a responsible and active American citizen.
  2. Do TWO of the following:

    1. Visit a place that is listed as a National Historic Landmark or that is on the National Register of Historic Places. Bring Scoutmaster verification of your visit to Merit Badge College. Explain in writing what you learned about the landmark or site and what you found interesting about it.

    2. Tour your state capitol building or the U.S. Capitol. Bring Scoutmaster verification of your visit to Merit Badge College. Explain in writing what you learned about the capitol, its function, and the history.

    3. Tour a federal facility. Bring Scoutmaster verification of your visit to Merit Badge College. Explain in writing what you saw there and what you learned about its function in the local community and how it serves this nation.

    4. Choose a national monument that interests you. Using books, brochures, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), and other resources, find out more about the monument. Explain in writing what you learned, and explain why the monument is important to this country’s citizens.

  3. For the five days prior to Merit Badge College, watch the national evening news or read the front page of a major daily newspaper. Discuss the national issues you learned about with your counselor. Choose one of the issues and explain how it affects you and your family.

  4. Discuss each of the following documents with your counselor. Tell your counselor how you feel life in the United States might be different without each one.
    1. Declaration of Independence
    2. Preamble to the Constitution
    3. The Constitution
    4. Bill of Rights
    5. Amendments to the Constitution
  5. List the six functions of government as noted in the preamble to the Constitution. Discuss with your counselor how these functions affect your family and local community.
  6. Choose a speech of national historical importance. Find out about the author, and explain in writing about the person who gave the speech. Explain in writing the importance of the speech at the time it was given, and how it applies to American citizens today. Choose a sentence or two from the speech that has significant meaning to you, and explain in writing why.

  7. Name the three branches of our federal government and explain to your counselor their functions. Explain how citizens are involved in each branch. For each branch of government, explain the importance of the system of checks and balances.
  8. In writing, name your two senators and the member of Congress from your congressional district. Bring to Merit Badge College a letter you have written to one of these elected officials about a national issue sharing your view with him or her. Show your letter to your counselor at Merit Badge College along with an unsealed, stamped envelope in preparation for sending it to one of these elected officials.

 

Citizenship in the World

Citizenship in the World
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Describe in writing and explain what citizenship in the world means to you and what you think it takes to be a good world citizen.

  2. Describe in writing and explain how one becomes a citizen in the United States, and explain the rights, duties, and obligations of U.S. citizenship. Discuss the similarities and differences between the rights, duties, and obligations of U.S. citizens and the citizens of two other countries.

  3. Do the following and describe in writing:

    1. Pick a current world event. In relation to this current event, describe in writing how a country’s national interest and its relationship with other countries might affect areas such as its security, its economy, its values, and the health of its citizens.

    2. Select a foreign country and describe in writing how its geography, natural resources, and climate influence its economy and its global partnerships with other countries.

  4. Do TWO of the following and describe in writing:

    1. Explain international law and how it differs from national law. Explain the role of international law and how international law can be used as a tool for conflict resolution.

    2. Using resources such as major daily newspapers, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), and news magazines, observe a current issue that involves international trade, foreign exchange, balance of payments, tariffs, and free trade. Explain what you have learned. Include in your discussion an explanation of why countries must cooperate in order for world trade and global competition to thrive.

    3. Select TWO of the following organizations and describe their role in the world.

      1. The United Nations

      2. The World Court

      3. World Organization of the Scout Movement

      4. The World Health Organization

      5. Amnesty International

      6. The International Committee of the Red Cross

      7. CARE

  5. Do the following:
    1. Discuss the difference between constitutional and nonconstitutional governments.
    2. Name at least five different types of governments currently in power in the world.
    3. Show on a world map countries that use each of these five different forms of government.
  6. Describe in writing the following:

    1. Explain how a government is represented abroad and how the United States government is accredited to international organizations.

    2. Describe the roles of the following in the conduct of foreign relations.

      1. Ambassador

      2. Consul

      3. Bureau of International Information Programs

      4. Agency for International Development

      5. United States and Foreign Commercial Service

    3. Explain the purpose of a passport and visa for international travel

  7. Do TWO of the following (with your parent’s permission) and describe in writing what you have learned:

    1. Visit the Web site of the U.S. State Department. Learn more about an issue you find interesting that is discussed on this Web site.

    2. Visit the Web site of an international news organization or foreign government, OR examine a foreign newspaper available at your local library, bookstore, or newsstand. Find a news story about a human right realized in the United States that is not recognized in another country.

    3. Visit with a student or Scout from another country and discuss the typical values, holidays, ethnic foods, and traditions practiced or enjoyed there.

    4. Attend a world Scout jamboree.

    5. Participate in or attend an international event in your area, such as an ethnic festival, concert, or play.

 

Digital Technology

Digital Technology
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Show your counselor your current, up-to-date Cyber Chip.** (All requirements for the Cyber Chip, except #1, must be completed prior to Merit Badge College. See ** sections below and meet the requirements for the grade level you are currently in )
  2. Do the following:
    1. Write a brief history of the changes in digital technology over time and describe how digital technology in your lifetime compares with that of your parent’s, grandparent’s, or other adult’s lifetime.
    2. Describe what kinds of computers or devices you imagine might be available when you are an adult.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor how text, sound, pictures, and videos are digitized for storage.
    2. Describe the difference between lossy and lossless data compression, and give an example where each might be used.
    3. Describe two digital devices and how they are made more useful by their programming.
    4. Discuss the similarities and differences between computers, mobile devices, and gaming consoles.
    5. Explain what a computer network is and describe the network’s purpose.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Explain what a program or software application or “app” is and how it is created.
    2. Name four software programs or mobile apps you or your family use, and explain how each one helps you.
    3. Describe what malware is, and explain how to protect your digital devices and the information stored on them.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Describe how digital devices are connected to the Internet.
    2. Using an Internet search engine (with your parent’s permission), find ideas about how to conduct a troop court of honor or campfire program. Print out a copy of the ideas from at least three different websites. Bring these copies with you, and explain to your counselor how you used the search engine to find this information.
    3. Use a Web browser to connect to an HTTPS (secure) website (with your parent’s permission). Explain to your counselor how to tell whether the site’s security certificate can be trusted, and what it means to use this kind of connection.
  6. Do THREE of the following. For each project you complete, copy the files to a backup device and share the finished projects with your counselor.
    (Bring your 3 projects with you to Merit Badge College on a backup device such as a USB drive.)
    1. Using a spreadsheet or database program, develop a food budget for a patrol weekend campout OR create a troop roster that includes the name, rank, patrol, and telephone number of each Scout. Show your counselor that you can sort the roster by each of the following categories: rank, patrol, and alphabetically by name.
    2. Using a word processor, write a draft letter to the parents of your troop’s Scouts, inviting them to a troop event.
    3. Using a graphics program, design and draw a campsite plan for your troop OR create a flier for an upcoming troop event, incorporating text and some type of visual such as a photograph or an illustration.
    4. Using a presentation software program, develop a report about a topic approved by your counselor. For your presentation, create at least five slides, with each one incorporating text and some type of visual such as a photograph or an illustration.
    5. Using a digital device, take a picture of a troop activity. Send or transfer this image to a device where it can be shared with your counselor.
    6. Make a digital recording of your voice, transfer the file to a different device, and have your counselor play back the recording.
    7. Create a blog and use it as an online journal of your Scouting activities, including group discussions and meetings, campouts, and other events. Include at least five entries and two photographs or illustrations. Share your blog with your counselor. You need not post the blog to the Internet; however, if you choose to go live with your blog, you must first share it with your parents AND counselor AND get their approval.
    8. Create a Web page for your troop, patrol, school, or place of worship. Include at least three articles and two photographs or illustrations. Include at least one link to a website of interest to your audience. You need not post the page to the Internet; however, if you decide to do so, you must first share the Web page with your parents AND counselor AND get their approval.
  7. Do the following:
    1. Write a paragraph about each of these protections and why they exist: copyright, patents, trademarks, trade secrets.
    2. Explain when it is permissible to accept a free copy of a program from a friend.
    3. Discuss with your counselor an article or a news report about a recent legal case involving an intellectual property dispute.
  8. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Describe in writing why it is important to properly dispose of digital technology. List at least three dangerous chemicals that could be used to create digital devices or used inside a digital device.
    2. Explain in writing to your counselor what is required to become a certified recycler of digital technology hardware or devices.
    3. Do an Internet search for an organization that collects discarded digital technology hardware or devices for repurposing or recycling. Find out what happens to that waste. Share in writing with your counselor what you found.
    4. Visit a recycling center that disposes of digital technology hardware or devices. Find out what happens to that waste. Share in writing what you learned with your counselor.
    5. Find a battery recycling center near you and find out what it does to recycle batteries. Share in writing what you have learned with your counselor about the proper methods for recycling batteries.
  9. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Investigate three career opportunities that involve digital technology. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
    2. Visit a business or an industrial facility that uses digital technology. Describe four ways digital technology is being used there. Share what you learned with your counselor.

 

** Cyber Chip Requirements for Grades 6-8 

  1. Read and sign the Level II Internet Safety Pledge from NetSmartz. (BSA Cyber Chip green card) (Cards will be available at Merit Badge College for you to sign)
  2. Write and sign a personalized contract with your parent or guardian that outlines rules for using the computer and mobile devices, including what you can download, what you can post, and consequences for inappropriate use.
  3. Watch the video “Friend or Fake,” along with two additional videos of your choosing, to see how friends can help each other to stay safe online. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting )
  4. As an individual or with your patrol, use the EDGE method and mini lessons to teach Internet safety rules, behavior, and “netiquette” to your troop or another patrol. You are encouraged to use any additional material and information you have researched. Each member of the patrol must have a role and present part of the lesson. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting )
  5. Discuss with your unit leader the acceptable standards and practices for using allowed electronic devices, such as phones and games, at your meetings and other Scouting events.

**Cyber Chip Requirements for Grades 9-12

  1. Read and sign the Level II Internet Safety Pledge. (BSA Cyber Chip green card) (Cards will be available at Merit Badge College for you to sign)
  2. Write and sign a personalized contract with your parent or guardian that outlines rules for using the computer and mobile devices, including what you can download, what you can post, and consequences for inappropriate use.
  3. Discuss with your parents the benefits and potential dangers teenagers might experience when using social media. Give examples of each.
  4. Watch three “Real-Life Story” videos to learn the impact on teens. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting)
  5. As an individual or patrol, use the EDGE method and the Teen Volunteer Kit to teach Internet safety rules, behavior, and “netiquette” to your troop or another patrol. You are encouraged to use any additional material and information you have researched. Each member of the patrol must have a role and present part of the lesson. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting)
  6. Discuss with your unit leader the acceptable standards and practices for using allowed electronic devices such as phones and games at your meetings and other Scouting events.

*Note: All Cyber Chips will expire annually. Each Scout will need to “recharge” the chip by going back to the Netsmartz Recharge area. This space will hold new information, news, and a place for the Scout to recommit to net safety and netiquette. Then, with the unit leader, the Scout can add the new date to the Cyber Chip card or certificate.

Disabilities Awareness

Disabilities Awareness
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Discuss with your counselor proper disability etiquette and person-first language. Explain why these are important.
  2. Visit an agency that works with people with physical, mental, emotional, or educational disabilities. Collect and read information about the agency’s activities. Learn about opportunities its members have for training, employment, and education. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.
  3. Do TWO of the following and be prepared to discuss what you have learned:
    1. Talk to a Scout who has a disability and learn about his experiences taking part in Scouting activities and earning different merit badges. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.
    2. Talk to an individual who has a disability and learn about this person’s experiences and the activities in which this person likes to participate. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.
    3. Learn how people with disabilities take part in a particular adaptive sport or recreational activity. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.
    4. Learn about independent living aids such as service animals, canes, and augmentative communication devices such as teletypewriters (TTYs). Discuss with your counselor how people use such aids.
  4. Visit TWO of the following locations and take notes about the accessibility to people with disabilities. In your notes, give examples of five things that could be done to improve upon the site and five things about the site that make it friendly to people with disabilities. Bring your notes to Merit Badge College. Be prepared to discuss your observations with your counselor.
    1. Your school
    2. Your place of worship
    3. Your Scout camping site
    4. A public exhibit or attraction (such as a theater, museum, or park)
  5. Explain what advocacy is. Do ONE of the following advocacy activities:
    1. Find out about disability awareness education programs in your school or school system, or contact a disability advocacy agency. Volunteer with a program or agency for eight hours. Bring certification of volunteer work to Merit Badge College signed by representative of the agency detailing location, supervisor, hours, and dates.
    2. Using resources such as disability advocacy agencies, government agencies, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), and news magazines, learn about myths and misconceptions that influence the general public’s understanding of people with disabilities. In writing, list 10 myths and misconceptions about people with disabilities and learn the facts about each myth. Bring this written report to Merit Badge College and be prepared to present it to the class.
  6. Make a commitment to your merit badge counselor describing what you will do to show a positive attitude about people with disabilities and to encourage positive attitudes among others. Discuss how your awareness has changed as a result of what you have learned.
  7. In writing, name five professions that provide services to people with disabilities. Pick one that interests you and in writing report on the education, training, and experience required for this profession. In the report, tell why this profession interests you.
Electricity

Electricity Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.
REQUIRES an additional $20.00 LAB FEE

  1. Demonstrate that you know how to respond to electrical emergencies by doing the following:
    1. Show how to rescue a person touching a live wire in the home.
    2. Show how to render first aid to a person who is unconscious from electrical shock.
    3. Show how to treat an electrical burn.
    4. Explain what to do in an electrical storm.
    5. Explain what to do in the event of an electrical fire.
  2. Complete an electrical home safety inspection of your home, using the checklist found in the Electricity merit badge pamphlet. Submit this along with a written discussion of what you find to your counselor.
  3. Make a simple electromagnet and use it to show magnetic attraction and repulsion.
  4. Explain the difference between direct current and alternating current.
  5. Make a simple drawing to show how a battery and an electric bell work.
  6. Explain why a fuse blows or a circuit breaker trips. Tell how to find a blown fuse or tripped circuit breaker in your home. Show how to safely reset the circuit breaker.
  7. Explain what overloading an electric circuit means. Tell what you have done to make sure your home circuits are not overloaded.
  8. Make a floor plan wiring diagram of the lights, switches, and outlets for a room in your home. Show which fuse or circuit breaker protects each one.
  9. Do the following:
    1. Read an electric meter and, using your family’s electric bill, determine the energy cost from the meter readings. Report your findings in writing.
    2. Discuss with your counselor five ways in which your family can conserve energy.
  10. Explain the following electrical terms: volt, ampere, watt, ohm, resistance, potential difference, rectifier, rheostat, conductor, ground, circuit, and short circuit.
  11. Do any TWO of the following:
    1. Connect a buzzer, bell, or light with a battery. Have a key or switch in the line.
    2. Make and run a simple electric motor (not from a kit).
    3. Build a simple rheostat. Show that it works.
    4. Build a single-pole, double-throw switch. Show that it works. (e) Hook a model electric train layout to a house circuit. Tell how it works.
Electronics

Electronics Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.
REQUIRES an additional $20.00 LAB FEE

  1. Describe the safety precautions you must exercise when using, building, altering, or repairing electronic devices.
  2. Do the following:

    1. Draw a simple schematic diagram. It must show resistors, capacitors, and transistors or integrated circuits. Use the correct symbols. Label all parts.

    2. List the purpose of each part.

  3. Do the following:
    1. Show the right way to solder and desolder
    2. Show how to avoid heat damage to electronic components.
    3. Tell about the function of a printed circuit board. Tell what precautions should be observed when soldering printed circuit boards.
  4. Discuss each of the following with your merit badge counselor, and then choose ONE of the following and build a circuit to show the techniques used:
    1. Tell how you can use electronics for a control purpose, and then build a control device circuit.
    2. Tell about the basic principles of digital techniques, and then build a digital circuit. Show how to change three decimal numbers into binary numbers and three binary numbers into decimal numbers.
    3. Tell about three audio applications of electronics, and then build an audio circuit. Show how to read the schematic diagram of the project you chose and, to the best of your ability, explain to your counselor how the circuit you built operates.
  5. Do the following:

    1. Explain in writing how to solve a simple problem involving current, voltage, and resistance using Ohm's law.

    2. Explain in writing the need for and the use of test equipment in electronics. Name three types of test equipment. Explain how they operate.

  6. Find out about three career opportunities in electronics that interest you. Explain in writing what training and education are needed for each position.

 

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Earn the First Aid merit badge. Bring a copy of your First Aid blue card to present to the merit badge counselor.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Discuss with your counselor the aspects of emergency preparedness:
      1. Prepare for emergency situations
      2. Respond to emergency situations
      3. Recover emergency situations
      4. Mitigate and prevent emergency situations
        Include in your discussion the kinds of questions that are important to ask yourself as you consider each of these.
    2. Make a chart that demonstrates your understanding of each of the aspects of emergency preparedness in requirement 2a (prepare, respond, recover, mitigate, and prevent) with regard to 10 of the situations listed below. You must use situations 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 (listed below), but you may choose any other five listed here for a total of 10 situations. Discuss this chart with your counselor.
      1. Home kitchen fire
      2. Home basement/storage room/garage fire
      3. Explosion in the home 
      4. Automobile crash
      5. Food-borne disease (food poisoning)
      6. Fire or explosion in a public place
      7. Vehicle stalled in the desert
      8. Vehicle trapped in a blizzard
      9. Flash flooding in town or in the country
      10. Mountain/backcountry accident  
      11. Boating or water accident
      12. Gas leak in a home or a building
      13. Tornado or hurricane
      14. Major flood
      15. Nuclear power plant emergency
      16. Avalanche (snowslide or rockslide)
      17. Violence in a public place 
    3. Meet with and teach your family how to get or build a kit, make a plan, and be informed for the situations on the chart you created for requirment 2b. Complete a family plan. In written form, report on your family meeting, discussing their responses, and sharing your family plan.
  3. Show how you could safely save a person from the following:
    1. Touching a live household electric wire
    2. A room filled with carbon monoxide
    3. Clothes on fire
    4. Drowning, using nonswimming rescues (including accidents on ice)
  4. Show three ways of attracting and communicating with rescue planes/aircraft.
  5. With another person, show a good way to transport an injured person out of a remote and/or rugged area, conserving the energy of rescuers while ensuring the well-being and protection of the injured person.
  6. Do the following:
    1. Tell the things a group of Scouts should be prepared to do, the training they need, and the safety precautions they should take for the following emergency services:
      1. Crowd and traffic control
      2. Messenger service and communication
      3. Collection and distribution services
      4. Group feeding, shelter, and sanitation
    2. In written form, identify the government or community agencies that normally handle and prepare for the emergency services listed under 6a, and explain how a group of Scouts could volunteer to help in the event of these types of emergencies.
    3. Find out who is your community’s emergency management director and learn what this person does to prepare, respond to, recover from, and mitigate and prevent emergency situations in your community. Discuss this information with your counselor and apply what you discover to the chart you created for requirement 2b.
  7. Take part in an emergency service project, either a real one or a practice drill, with a Scouting unit or a community agency. Bring Scoutmaster verification. Submit in written form the details of the emergency service project. (Please note: Participation in an Emergency Drill at summer camp does not satisfy this requirement.)
  8. Do the following:
    1. Prepare a written plan for mobilizing your troop when needed to do emergency service. If there is already a plan, explain it. Tell your part in making it work.
    2. Take part in at least one troop mobilization. Describe your part to your counselor. Afterward, conduct an “after-action” lesson, discussing with your counselor what you learned during the exercise that required changes or adjustments to the plan. (Please note: Participation in an Emergency Drill at summer camp does not satisfy this requirement.)
    3. Prepare and bring to Merit Badge College a personal emergency service pack for a mobilization call. Prepare and bring to Merit Badge College a family emergency kit (suitcase or waterproof box) for use by your family in case an emergency evacuation is needed. Explain in written form the needs and uses of the contents. (Please note: For the Family Kit, the Scout may bring the actual kit with him or take photos of the kit in which the contents of the kit and the scout are clearly visible (suggestion: 4 or more photos – 1 of all items and the Scout and 3 others which are close-ups of the items in 3 sections, or more) to satisfy this requirement along with the written explanation of the contents and their needs and uses.)
  9. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Using a safety checklist approved by your counselor, inspect your home for potential hazards. Explain in written form the hazards you find and how they can be corrected.
    2. In written form, develop a plan of escape for your family in case of fire in your home.
    3. In written form, develop an accident prevention program for five family activities outside the home (such as taking a picnic or seeing a movie) that includes an analysis of possible hazards, a proposed plan to correct those hazards, and the reasons for the corrections you propose.

 

Engineering

Engineering Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.
REQUIRES an additional $20.00 LAB FEE

  1. Select a manufactured item in your home (such as a toy or an appliance) and, under adult supervision and with the approval of your counselor, investigate how and why it works as it does. Find out what sort of engineering activities were needed to create it. Write a report about what you learned and how you got the information and be prepared to present your report to the class. If possible, bring the object with you to the class.

  2. Select an engineering achievement that has had a major impact on society. Using resources such as the Internet (with your parent’s permission), books, and magazines, write a report about the engineers who made this engineering feat possible, the special obstacles they had to overcome, and how this achievement has influenced the world today.

  3. Explain the work of six types of engineers. Pick two of the six and explain how their work is related.
  4. Visit with an engineer (who may be your counselor or parent) and do the following:
    1. Discuss the work this engineer does and the tools the engineer uses.
    2. Discuss with the engineer a current project and the engineer’s particular role in it.
    3. Find out how the engineer’s work is done and how results are achieved.
    4. Ask to see the reports that the engineer writes concerning the project.
    5. Discuss with your counselor what you learned about engineering from this visit.
  5. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Use the systems engineering approach to make step-by-step plans for your next campout. List alternative ideas for such items as program schedule, campsites, transportation, and costs. Be prepared to present the plan to the class and tell why you made the choices you did and what improvements were made.

    2. Make an original design for a piece of patrol equipment. Use the systems engineering approach to help you decide how it should work and look. Draw plans for it. Be prepared to present the plan to the class and explain why you designed it the way you did, and explain how you would make it.

  6. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Transforming motion. Using common materials or a construction set, make a simple model that will demonstrate motion. Explain how the model uses basic mechanical elements like levers and inclined planes to demonstrate motion. Describe an example where this mechanism is used in a real product.
    2. Using electricity. Make a list of 10 electrical appliances in your home. Find out approximately how much electricity each uses in one month. Learn how to find out the amount and cost of electricity used in your home during periods of light and heavy use. List five ways to conserve electricity.
    3. Understanding electronics. Using an electronic device such as a mobile telephone or portable digital media player, find out how sound travels from one location to another. Explain how the device was designed for ease of use, function, and durability.
    4. Using materials. Do experiments to show the differences in strength and heat conductivity in wood, metal, and plastic. Discuss with your counselor what you have learned.
    5. Converting energy. Do an experiment to show how mechanical, heat, chemical, solar, and/or electrical energy may be converted from one or more types of energy to another. Explain your results. Describe to your counselor what energy is and how energy is converted and used in your surroundings.
    6. Moving people. Find out the different ways people in your community get to work. Make a study of traffic flow (number of vehicles and relative speed) in both heavy and light traffic periods. Discuss with your counselor what might be improved to make it easier for people in your community to get where they need to go.
    7. Building an engineering project. Enter a project in a science or engineering fair or similar competition. (This requirement may be met by participation on an engineering competition project team.) Discuss with your counselor what your project demonstrates, the kinds of questions visitors to the fair asked you, and how well were you able to answer their questions.
  7. Explain what it means to be a registered Professional Engineer (P.E.). Name the types of engineering work for which registration is most important.
  8. Study the Engineer’s Code of Ethics. Explain how it is like the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
  9. Find out three career opportunities in engineering. Pick one and research the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Write a report discussing this and explaining why this profession might interest you.

 

Fingerprinting

Fingerprinting Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Write a short history of fingerprinting. Tell the difference between civil and criminal identification.

  2. In written form, explain the difference between the automated fingerprint identification systems (AFIS) now used by some law enforcement agencies and the biometric fingerprint systems used to control access to places like buildings, airports, and computer rooms.

  3. Do the following:
    1. Name the surfaces of the body where friction or papillary ridges are found.
    2. Explain the two basic principles supporting the science of fingerprints and give a brief explanation of each principle.
    3. Explain what it takes to positively identify a person using fingerprints.
  4. Take a clear set of prints using ONE of the following methods.
    1. Make both rolled and plain impressions. Make these on an 8-by-8-inch fingerprint identification card, available from your local police department or your counselor.
    2. Using clear adhesive tape, a pencil, and plain paper, record your own fingerprints or those of another person.
  5. Show your merit badge counselor you can identify the three basic types of fingerprint patterns and their subcategories. Using your own hand, identify the types of patterns you see.

 

Graphic Arts

Game Design Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Do the following:
    1. Analyze four games you have played, each from a difference medium. Identify the medium, player format, objectives, rules, resources, and theme (if relevant). Briefly write down for your counselor the play experience, what you enjoy in each game, and what you dislike. Make a chart to compare and contrast the games.
    2. Describe in writing four types of play value and provide an example of a game built around each concept. List several other reasons people play games.
  2. Select five of the following 17 game design terms and write a brief definition. For each term that you pick, describe how it relates to a specific game.

Thematic game elements: story, setting, characters
Gameplay elements: play sequence, level design, interface design
Game analysis: difficulty, balance, depth, pace, replay value, age appropriateness
Related terms: single-player vs. multiplayer, cooperative vs. competitive, turn-based vs. real-time, strategy vs. reflex vs. chance, abstract vs. thematic

  1. In writing: Define the term intellectual property. Describe the types of intellectual property associated with the game design industry. Describe how intellectual property is protected and why protection is necessary. Define and give an example of a licensed property.
  2. Do the following:
    1.  Pick a game where the players can change the rules or objectives (examples: basketball, hearts, chess, kickball). Briefly summarize in writing the standard rules and objectives and play through the game normally.
    2. Propose changes to several rules or objectives. Predict how each change will affect gameplay and write down your assessment.
    3. Play the game with one rule or objective change, observing how the players’ actions and emotional experiences are affected by the rule change. Repeat this process with two other changes and write down your observations.
    4. Explain in writing to your counselor how the changes affected the actions and experience of the players. Write about the accuracy of your predictions.
  3. Design a new game. Any game medium or combination of mediums is acceptable. Record your work in a game design notebook.
    1. Write a vision statement for your game. Identify the medium, player format, objective, and theme of the game. If suitable, describe the setting, story, and characters.
    2. Describe in writing the play value.
    3. Make a preliminary list of the rules of the game. Define the resources.
    4. Draw the game elements. 

You must have your Scoutmaster’s approval of your concept before you begin creating the prototype.

  1. Do the following:
    1. Prototype your game from requirement 5. If applicable, demonstrate to your counselor that you have addressed player safety through the rules and equipment.
    2. Test your prototype with as many other people as you need to meet the player format. Compare in writing the play experience to your descriptions from requirement 5b. Correct unclear rules, holes in the rules, dead ends, and obvious rule exploits. Change at least one rule, mechanic, or objective from your first version of the game, and describe why you are making the change. Play the game again. Record whether or not your change had the expected effect.
    3. Repeat 6b at least two more times.
  2. Blind test your game. Do the following:
    1. Write an instruction sheet that includes all of the information needed to play the game. Clearly describe how to set up the game, play the game, and end the game. List the game objectives.
    2. Be prepared to play/share your prototype from requirement 6 with a group of players that has not played it or witnessed a previous playtest at Merit Badge College. (NOTE: bring all components and equipment needed to play your game with you, be prepared to have other Scouts play it.) Provide them with your instruction sheet(s) and any physical components. Watch them play the game, but do not provide them with instruction. Record their feedback in your game design notebook.
    3. Share your game design notebook with your counselor. Discuss the player reactions to your project and what you learned about the game design process. Based on your testing, determine what you like most about your game and suggest one or more changes.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. With your parent’s permission, visit with a professional in the game development industry and ask him or her about his or her job and how it fits into the overall development process. Alternately, meet with a professional in game development education and discuss the skills he or she emphasizes in the classroom. Write down a brief biography of your interviewee and outline key questions and his or her answers to your questions.
    2. List three career opportunities in game development. Pick one and write about the education, training, and experience required for the profession. Discuss this with your counselor. Write about why this profession might interest you.
Graphic Arts

Graphic Arts Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Review with your counselor the processes for producing printed communications: offset lithography, screen printing, electronic/digital, relief, and gravure. Collect samples of three products, each one produced using a different printing process, or draw diagrams to help you with your description. Bring samples to Merit Badge College.
  2. Explain the differences between continuous tone, line, and halftone artwork. Describe how digital images can be created and/or stored in a computer.
  3. Design a printed piece (flier, T-shirt, program, form, etc.) and produce it. Bring it to Merit Badge College. Explain in writing your decisions for the typeface or typefaces you use and the way you arrange the elements in your design. Explain which printing process is best suited for printing your design. If desktop publishing is available, identify what hardware and software would be appropriate for outputting your design.
  4. Produce the design you created for requirement 3 using one of the following processes: (Bring hard copies to Merit Badge College.)
    1. Offset lithography: Make a layout, and produce a plate using a process approved by your counselor. Run the plate and print at least 50 copies.
    2. Screen printing: Make a hand-cut or photographic stencil and attach it to a screen that you have prepared. Mask the screen and print at least 20 copies.
    3. Electronic/digital printing: Create a layout in electronic form, download it to the press or printer, and run 50 copies. If no electronic interface to the press or printer is available, you may print and scan a paper copy of the layout.
    4. Relief printing: Prepare a layout or set the necessary type. Make a plate or lock up the form. Use this to print 50 copies.
  5. Review the following postpress operations with your counselor:
    1. Discuss the finishing operations of padding, drilling, cutting, and trimming.
    2. Collect and bring to Merit Badge College examples of the following types of binding: perfect, spiral, plastic comb, saddle-stitched, and case.
  6. Do ONE of the following, and then describe the highlights of your visit:
    1. Visit a newspaper printing plant: Follow a story from the editor to the press.
    2. Visit a retail, commercial, or in-plant printing facility. Follow a project from beginning to end.
    3. Visit a school’s graphic arts program. Find out what courses are available and what the prerequisites are.
    4. Visit three Web sites (with your parent’s permission) that belong to graphic arts professional organizations and/or printing-related companies (suppliers, manufacturers, printers). With permission from your parent or counselor, print out or download product or service information from two of the sites.
  7. Find out about three career opportunities in graphic arts. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Report in writing what you learned and explain why this profession might interest you.

 

Indian Lore

Indian Lore Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Give the history of one American Indian tribe, group, or nation that lives or has lived near you. Visit it, if possible. Tell about traditional dwellings, way of life, tribal government, religious beliefs, family and clan relationships, language, clothing styles, arts and crafts, food preparation, means of getting around, games, customs in warfare, where members of the group now live, and how they live.
  2. Do TWO of the following and bring to class. Focus on a specific group or tribe:
    1. Make an item of clothing worn by members of the tribe.
    2. Make and decorate three items used by the tribe, as approved by your counselor.
    3. Make an authentic model of a dwelling used by any Indian tribe, group, or nation.
    4. Visit a museum to see Indian artifacts. Report in writing on what you have seen. Identify in your report at least ten artifacts by tribe or nation, their shape, size and use.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Learn three games played by a group or tribe. Teach and lead one game with a Scout group.
    2. Learn and show how a tribe traditionally cooked or prepared food. Make three food items.
    3. Give a demonstration showing how a specific Indian group traditionally hunted, fished, or trapped.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Write or briefly describe how life might have been different for the European settlers if there had been no native Americans to meet them when they came to this continent.
    2. Sing two songs in an Indian language. Explain their meanings.
    3. Learn in an Indian language at least twenty-five common terms and their meanings.
    4. Show twenty-five signs in Indian sign language. Include those that will help you ask for water, for food, and where the path or road leads.
    5. Learn an Indian story of up to 300 words (or several shorter stories adding up to no more than 300 words). Tell the story or stories at a Scout gathering or campfire.
    6. Write or tell about eight things adopted by others from American Indians.
    7. Learn twenty-five Indian place names. Tell their origins and meanings.
    8. Name five well-known American Indian leaders, either from the past or people of today. Give their tribes or nations. Describe what they did or do now that makes them notable.
    9. Learn about the Iroquois Confederacy, including how and why it was formed. Tell about its governing system. Describe some of the similarities and differences between the governments of the United States and of the Six Nations (the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy).
Inventing

Inventing Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. In your own words, define inventing. Then do the following:
    1. Explain to your merit badge counselor the role of inventors and their inventions in the economic development of the United States.
    2. List three inventions and write about how they have helped humankind.

  2. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Identify and interview with a buddy (and with your parent’s permission) an individual in your community who has invented a useful item. Write a report about what you learned.

    2. Read about and list three inventors. Select the one you find most interesting and write about what you learned.

  3. Do EACH of the following:
    1. Define the term intellectual property. Explain which government agencies oversee the protection of intellectual property, the types of intellectual property that can be protected, how such property is protected, and why protection is necessary.
    2. Write about the components of a patent and the different types of patents available.

    3. Examine your Scouting gear and find a patent number on a camping item you have used. With your parent’s permission, use the Internet to find out more about that patent. Compare the finished item with the claims and drawings in the patent. Report what you learned to your counselor.

    4. Explain to your counselor the term patent infringement.
  4. Discuss with your counselor the types of inventions that are appropriate to share with others, and explain why. Research one nonpatented or noncopyrighted invention and its impact on society.
  5. Choose a commercially available product that you have used on an overnight camping trip with your troop. Make recommendations for improving the product, and make a sketch that shows your recommendations. Discuss your recommendations with your counselor.

  6. Think of an item you would like to invent that would solve a problem for your family, troop, chartered organization, community, or a special-interest group. Then do EACH of the following, while keeping a notebook to record your progress.
    1. Talk to potential users of your invention and determine their needs. Then, based on what you have learned, write a statement describing the invention and how it would help solve a problem. This statement should include a detailed sketch of the invention.

    2. Create a model of the invention using clay, cardboard, or any other readily available material. List the materials necessary to build a prototype of the invention.

    3. Share the idea and the model with your counselor and potential users of your invention. Record their feedback in your notebook.
  7. Build a working prototype of the item you invented for requirement 6. Test and evaluate the invention. Among the aspects to consider in your evaluation are cost, usefulness, marketability, appearance, and function. Describe how your original vision and expectations for your invention are similar or dissimilar to the prototype you built. Have your counselor evaluate and critique your prototype.

  8. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Participate with a club or team (robotics team, science club, or engineering club) that builds a useful item. Share your experience with your counselor.

    2. Visit a museum or exhibit dedicated to an inventor or invention, and create a presentation of your visit to share with a group such as your troop or patrol.

  9. Write about the diverse skills, education, training, and experience it takes to be an inventor and how you can prepare yourself to be creative and inventive to solve problems at home, in school, and in your community. List three career fields that might utilize the skills of an inventor.

Law

Law Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. In writing define "law". Tell some of its sources. Describe functions it serves.
  2. Discuss TWO of the following:
    1. Justinian’s Code, the Code of Hammurabi, and the Magna Carta
    2. The development of the jury system
    3. Two famous trials in history
  3. In writing tell what civil law is; tell what criminal law is. Tell the main differences between them. Give examples of each.
  4. Ask five people (not more than one from your immediate family) about the role of law enforcement officers in our society. Discuss their answers with them. Go to a law enforcement officer in your neighborhood and ask about his or her responsibilities and duties. Report your findings.
  5. In writing, tell about several laws that have been passed to protect the consumer and the seller. Tell about several organizations that provide help to consumers and sellers.
  6. Plan and conduct a mock trial with your troop or school class. After the trial is over, discuss it with the group.
  7. Visit with a lawyer who works for a business, bank, title company, or government agency. Find out his or her duties and responsibilities. Report what you learned.
  8. Explain the requirements for becoming a lawyer in your state. Describe how judges are selected in your state.
  9. Make a list of 15 jobs that deal with some aspects of law or legal processes. Tell which you prefer. Why?
  10. Describe in writing where people can go to obtain the help of a lawyer if they are unable to pay for one. Describe what you can do if you can afford a lawyer but do not know of any in your area.
  11. Be prepared to discuss with your counselor the importance in our society of TWO of the following areas of law:
    1. Environmental law
    2. Computers and the Internet
    3. Copyright and the Internet
    4. Space travel and satellites orbiting Earth
    5. Patents
    6. Biotechnology 
    7. Privacy law 
    8. International law

 

Lifesaving

Lifesaving Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

SEND COPY OF CURRENT CPR CARD WITH YOUR REGISTRATION
BE PREPARED - TESTING begins immediately following Boy Scout Swim test

  1. Before doing requirements 2 through 15: (Bring your signed Boy Scout Handbook)

    1. Complete Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c and First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c.

      Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c:
      (7a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
      (7b) Demonstrate your ability to jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.
      {7c) Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, by reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.

      First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c:
      (9a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
      (9b) Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.
      (9c) With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.)
       

    2. Swim continuously for 400 yards using each of the following strokes in a strong manner for at least 50 continuous yards: front crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, and elementary backstroke.

  2. Explain the following:
    1. Common drowning situations and how to prevent them.
    2. How to identify persons in the water who need assistance.
    3. The order of methods in water rescue.
    4. How rescue techniques vary depending on the setting and the condition of the person needing assistance.
    5. Situations for which in-water rescues should not be undertaken.
  3. Demonstrate "reaching" rescues using various items such as arms, legs, towels, shirts, paddles, and poles.
  4. Demonstrate "throwing" rescues using various items such as lines, ring buoys, rescue bags, and free-floating supports. Successfully place at least one such aid within reach of a practice victim 25 feet from shore.
  5. Show or explain the use of rowboats, canoes, or other small craft in performing rescues.
  6. List various items that can be used as rescue aids in a noncontact swimming rescue. Explain why buoyant aids are preferred.
  7. Perform the following equipment-based rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Use a proper entry and a strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.
    1. Present a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety,
    2. Present a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.
    3. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety.
    4. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.
    5. Remove street clothes in 20 seconds or less and use a nonbuoyant aid, such as a shirt or towel, to tow the subject to safety. Explain when it is appropriate to remove heavy clothing before attempting a swimming rescue.
  8. Explain the importance of avoiding contact with an active victim and describe lead-and-wait tactics.
  9. Perform the following nonequipment rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Begin in the water from a position near the subject. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.
    1. Provide a swim-along assist for a calm, responsive, tired swimmer moving with a weak forward stroke.
    2. Perform an armpit tow for a calm, responsive, tired swimmer resting with a back float.
    3. Perform a cross-chest carry for an exhausted, passive victim who does not respond to instructions to aid himself.
  10. In deep water, show how to escape from a victim's grasp on your wrist. Repeat for front and rear holds about the head and shoulders.
  11. Perform the following rescues for an unconscious practice subject at or near the surface 30 feet from shore. Use a proper entry and strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject and splash water on him to determine his condition before making contact. Remove the victim from the water, with assistance if needed, and position for CPR.
    1. Perform an equipment assist using a buoyant aid.
    2. Perform a front approach and wrist tow
    3. Perform a rear approach and armpit tow.
  12. Describe how to respond if a victim submerges before being reached by a rescuer, and do the following:
    1. Recover a 10-pound weight in 8 to 10 feet of water using a feetfirst surface dive.
    2. Repeat using a headfirst surface dive.
  13. Demonstrate knowledge of resuscitation procedures:
    1. Describe how to recognize the need for rescue breathing and CPR.
    2. Demonstrate proper CPR technique for at least 3 minutes using a mannequin designed to simulate ventilations and compressions.
  14. Demonstrate management of a spinal injury:
    1. Explain the signs and symptoms of a spinal injury.
    2. Support a faceup victim in calm, shallow water
    3. Turn a subject from a facedown to a faceup position while maintaining support.
  15. Show that you know first aid for other injuries or illnesses that could occur while swimming or boating, including hypothermia, heat reactions, muscle cramps, sunburn, stings, and hyperventilation.

 

Medicine

Medicine Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Discuss with your counselor the influence that EIGHT of the following people had on the history of medicine.
    1. Hippocrates
    2. William Harvey
    3. Antonie van Leewenhoe
    4. Edward Jenner
    5. Florence Nightingale
    6. Louis Pasteur
    7. Gregor Mendel
    8. Joseph Lister
    9. Robert Koch
    10. Daniel Hale Williams
    11. Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen
    12. Marie and Pierre Curie
    13. Walter Reed
    14. Karl Landsteiner
    15. Alexander Fleming
    16. Charles Richard Drew
    17. Helen Raussig
    18. James Watson and Francis Crick
    19. Jonas Salk
  2. Explain in writing the Hippocratic oath to your counselor, and compare the original version to a more modern one. Discuss to whom those subscribing to the original version of the oath owe the greatest allegiance.

  3. Discuss the health-care provider-patient relationship with your counselor, and the importance of such a relationship in the delivery of quality care to the patient. Describe the role of confidentiality in this relationship.
  4. Do the following: and submit in writing:

    1. Describe the roles the following people play in the delivery of health care in your state. (Note: Not all may exist in your state)

      1. Allopathic physician

      2. Chiropractor

      3. Emergency medical technician

      4. Licensed practical/vocational nurse

      5. Medical assistant

      6. Medical laboratory technologist

      7. Nurse-midwife

      8. Nurse practitioner

      9. Occupational nurse

      10. Optometrist

      11. Osteopathic physician

      12. Pharmacist

      13. Physical therapist

      14. Physician’s assistant

      15. Podiatrist

      16. Psychologist

      17. Radiologic technologist 

      18. Registered nurse 

      19. Respiratory therapist

    2. Describe in writing the educational and licensing requirements for FIVE of those in 4(a) --other than 4a(1) --practicing health care in your state.

  5. Do the Following

    1.  Describe in writing what is meant by the term "primary care" with regard to a medical specialty. Briefly describe the types of work done by physicians in the following "core" specialties:

      1. Internal medicine*

      2. Family practice*

      3. Obstetrics/gynecology*

      4. Pediatrics*

      5. Psychiatry

      6. Surgery *
        “Primary Care” specialties

    2. Describe the additional educational requirements for these specialties.

  6. Do the following:

    1. Briefly describe in writing the types of work performed by physicians in FIVE of the following specialties or subspecialties:

      1. Allergy/immunology

      2. Anesthesiology

      3. Cardiology

      4. Colon and rectal surgery

      5. Dermatology

      6. Emergency medicine

      7. Endocrinology

      8. Gastroenterology

      9. Geriatric medicine

      10. Hematology/oncology

      11. Infectious disease

      12. Nephrology

      13. Neuro surgery

      14. Neurology

      15. Nuclear medicine

      16. Ophthalmology

      17. Orthopedic surgery

      18. Otolaryngology/head and neck surgery

      19. Pathology

      20. Physical medicine and rehabilitation

      21. Plastic, reconstructive, and maxillofacial surgery

      22. Preventive medicine 

      23. Radiology

      24. Rheumatology 

      25. Thoracic/cardiothoracic surgery

      26. Urology

      27. Vascular surgery

    2. Describe the additional educational requirements for the FIVE specialties or subspecialties you chose in 6(a)

  7. Do the following:
    1. (a) Visit a physician's office*, preferably one who delivers “primary care.” (This may be that of your counselor.) Discuss the components of a medical history and physical examination (an official BSA health form may be used to guide this discussion), and become familiar with the instruments used.
      * If this cannot be arranged, demonstrate to your counselor that you understand the components of a medical history and physical, and discuss the instruments involved.
    2. Describe the characteristics of a good diagnostic test to screen for disease. (e.g., routine blood pressure measurement). Explain briefly why diagnostic tests are not “perfect.”
    3. Show how to take a blood pressure and a pulse reading.
  8. Do the following:

    1. Write about the roles medical societies, employers, the insurance industry, and the government play in influencing the practice of medicine in the United States.

    2. Briefly explain how your state monitors the quality of health care within its borders, and how it provides care to those who do not have health insurance.

  9. Discuss with your counselor the health-care delivery systems in the United States, Sweden, and China.
  10. Serve as a volunteer at a health-related event or facility in your community (e.g., blood drive, “health fair,” blood pressure screening, etc.) approved by your counselor.

 

Metalwork

Metalwork Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

REQUIRES an additional $10.00 LAB FEE

  1. Read the safety rules listed in the Metalwork merit badge pamphlet. Describe in writing how to be safe while working with metal. Describe in writing the additional safety rules that apply to the Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith option.

  2. Define in writing the terms native metal, malleable, metallurgy, alloy, nonferrous, and ferrous. Then in writing do the following:

    1. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.

    2. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.

    3. Describe how to work-harden a metal.

    4. Describe how to anneal a nonferrous and a ferrous metal.

  3. Do the following:
    1. Work-harden a piece of 26– or 28– gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Put a 45-degree bend in the metal, then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.
    2. Soften the work-hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it, and then try to remove the 45-degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
    3. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.
  4. Complete a written report about three career opportunities in metalworking. Pick one and include in your report the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Also explain in the report why this profession might interest you. Be prepared to discuss this with your counselor.

  5. After completing the first four requirements, complete the option listed below.
    1. Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith
      1. Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.
      2. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
      3. Make two objects out of 24– or 26– gauge sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Construct these objects using a metal that is appropriate to the object’s ultimate purpose, and using cutting, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing.
        1. One object also must include at least one riveted component.
        2. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.

 

Mining in Society

Mining in Society
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Do the following:
    1. Select 10 different minerals. For each one, in writing, name a product for which the mineral is used.
    2. Explain the role mining has in producing and processing things that are grown.
    3. From the list of minerals you chose for requirement 1a, determine the countries where those minerals can be found, include this in your written report, and be prepared to discuss what you learned with your counselor.
  2. Obtain a map of your state or region showing major cities, highways, rivers, and railroads. Mark the locations of five different mining enterprises. Find out what resource is processed at each location, and identify the mine as a surface or underground operation. Discuss with your counselor how the resources mined at these locations are used.
  3. Discuss with your counselor the potential hazards a miner may encounter at an active mine and the protective measures used by miners. In your discussion, explain how:
    1. The miner's personal protective equipment is worn and used, including a hard hat, safety glasses, earplugs, dust mask or respirator, self-rescue device, and high-visibility vest.
    2. Miners protect their hands and feet from impact, pinch, vibration, slipping, and tripping/falling hazards.
    3. Monitoring equipment warns miners of imminent danger, and how robots are used in mine rescues.
  4. Discuss with your counselor the dangers someone might encounter at an abandoned mine. Include information about the "Stay Out-Stay Alive" program.
  5. Do one of the following:
    1. With your parent's approval and your counselor's assistance, use the Internet to find and take a virtual tour of two types of mines. Determine the similarities and differences between them regarding resource exploration, mine planning and permitting, types of equipment used, and the minerals produced. Discuss with your counselor what you learned from your Internet-based mine tours.
    2. With your parent's permission and counselor's approval, visit a mining or minerals exhibit at a museum. Find out about the history of the museum's exhibit and the type of mining it represents. Give three examples of how mineral resources have influenced history.
    3. With your parent's permission and counselor's approval, visit an active mine.* Find out about the tasks required to explore, plan, permit, mine, and process the resource mined at that site. Take photographs if allowed, and request brochures from your visit. Share photos, brochures, and what you have learned with your counselor.
    4. With your parent's permission and counselor's approval, visit a mining equipment manufacturer or supplier.* Discuss the types of equipment produced or supplied there, and in what part of the mining process this equipment is used. Take photographs if allowed, and request brochures from your visit. Share photos, brochures, and what you have learned with your counselor.
    5. Discuss with your counselor two methods used to reduce rock in size, one of which uses a chemical process to extract a mineral. Explain the difference between smelting and refining.
    6. Learn about the history of a local mine, including what is or was mined there, how the deposit was found, the mining techniques and processes used, and how the mined resource is or was used. Find out from a historian, community leader, or business person how mining has affected your community. Note any social, cultural, or economic consequences of mining in your area. Share what you have learned with your counselor.
  6. Do the following:
    1. Choose a modern mining site. Find out what is being done to help control environmental impacts. Share what you have learned about mining and sustainability.
    2. In writing, explain reclamation as it is used in mining and how mine reclamation pertains to Scouting's no-trace principles.
    3. Discuss with your counselor what values society has about returning the land to the benefit of wildlife and people after mining has ended. Discuss the transformation of the BSA Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve from a mine site to its current role.
  7. Do one of the following:
    1. Explore the anticipated benefits of interplanetary mining. Learn how NASA and private investors may search for, extract, and process minerals in outer space, and the primary reasons for mining the moon, other planets, or near-Earth asteroids. Find out how exploration and mineral processing in space differ from exploration on Earth. Share what you have learned with your counselor, and discuss the difficulties encountered in exploring, collecting, and analyzing surface or near-surface samples in space.
    2. Identify three minerals found dissolved in seawater or found on the ocean floor, and list three places where the ocean is mined today. Share this information with your counselor, and discuss the chief incentives for mining the oceans for minerals, the reclamation necessary after mining is over, and any special concerns when mining minerals from the ocean. Find out what sustainability problems arise from mining the oceans. Discuss what you learn with your counselor.
    3. Learn what metals and minerals are recycled after their original use has ended. List four metals and two nonmetals, and find out how each can be recycled. Find out how recycling affects the sustainability of natural resources and how this idea is related to mining. Discuss what you learn with your counselor. d. With your parent's permission, use the Internet and other resources to determine the current price of gold, copper, aluminum, or other commodities like cement or coal, and find out the five-year price trend for two of these. Report your findings to your counselor. 8. Do one of the following: a. With your parent's and counselor's approval, meet with a worker in the mining industry. Discuss the work, equipment, and technology used in this individual's position, and learn about a current project. Ask to see reports, drawings, and/or maps made for the project. Find out about the educational and professional requirements for this individual's position. Ask how the individual's mining career began. Discuss with your counselor what you have learned. b. Find out about three career opportunities in the mining industry. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you. c. With your parent's permission and counselor's approval, visit a career academy or community college to learn about educational and training requirements for a position in the mining industry that interests you. Find out why this position is critical to the mining industry, and discuss what you learned with your counselor.

* Visiting a mine site, a mining equipment manufacturer, or an equipment supplier requires advance planning. These sites can be potentially dangerous. You will need permission from your parent and counselor, and the manager of the mine site, or equipment manufacturer or supplier. While there, you will be required to follow closely the site manager's instructions and comply with all safety rules and procedures, including wearing appropriate clothing, footwear, and personal safety equipment.

Moviemaking

Moviemaking
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Discuss and demonstrate the proper elements of a good motion picture. In your discussion, include visual storytelling, rhythm, the 180-axis rule, camera movement, framing and composition of camera shots, and lens selection.
  2. Do the following:
    1. In a three- or four-paragraph treatment, tell the story you plan to produce, making sure that the treatment conveys a visual picture. Bring to Merit Badge College.
    2. Prepare a storyboard for your motion picture (This can be done with rough sketches and stick figures.) Bring to Merit Badge College.
    3. Demonstrate the following motion picture shooting techniques.
      1. Using a tripod
      2. Panning a camera
      3. Framing a shot
      4. Selecting an angle
      5. Selecting proper lighting
      6. Hand-held shooting
    4. Using motion picture shooting techniques, plan ONE of the following programs. Start with a treatment, and complete the requirement by presenting this program to a pack or your troop, patrol, or class.
      1. Film or videotape a court of honor and show it to an audience.
      2. Create a short feature of your own design, using the techniques you learned.
      3. Shoot a vignette that could be used to train a new Scout in a Scouting skill.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. With your parent's permission and your counselor's approval, visit a film set or a television production studio and watch how production work is done.
    2. Explain to your counselor the elements of the zoom lens and three important parts.
  4. Find out about three career opportunities in moviemaking. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Bring as a written report to Merit Badge College. Be prepared to discuss this career with your counselor. In your written report, explain why this profession might interest you.
Personal Management

Personal Management
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

Important - Please note: Scouts will only receive a partial for this Merit Badge at Merit Badge College as requirement #2 requires a period of 13 weeks to complete. In order to complete the Merit Badge, the Scout must meet with a counselor to complete requirement #2 and any other incomplete requirements.

  1. Do the following:

    1. Choose an item that your family might want to purchase that is considered a major expense.

    2. Write a plan that tells how your family would save money for the purchase identified in requirement 1a.

      1. Discuss the plan with your merit badge counselor.

      2. Discuss the plan with your family.

      3. Discuss how other family needs must be considered in this plan.

    3. Develop a written shopping strategy for the purchase identified in requirement 1a.

      1. Determine the quality of the item or service (using consumer publications or ratings systems).

      2. Comparison shop for the item. Find out where you can buy the item for the best price. (Provide prices from at least two different price sources.) Call around, study ads. Look for a sale or discount coupon. Consider alternatives. Can you buy the item used? Should you wait for a sale?

  2. Do the following:
    1. Prepare a budget reflecting your expected income (allowance, gifts, wages), expenses, and savings. Track your actual income, expenses, and savings for 13 consecutive weeks. (You may use the forms provided in the merit badge pamphlet, devise your own, or use a computer-generated version.) When complete, present the results to your merit badge counselor.
    2. Compare expected income with expected expenses.
      1. If expenses exceed income, determine steps to balance your budget.
      2. If income exceeds expenses, state how you would use the excess money (new goal, savings).
  3. Discuss with your merit badge counselor FIVE of the following concepts:
    1. The emotions you feel when you receive money.
    2. Your understanding of how the amount of money you have with you affects your spending habits.
    3. Your thoughts when you buy something new and your thoughts about the same item three months later. Explain the concept of buyer’s remorse. d. How hunger affects you when shopping for food items (snacks, groceries).
    4. Your experience of an item you have purchased after seeing or hearing advertisements for it. Did the item work as well as advertised?
    5. Your understanding of what happens when you put money into a savings account.
    6. Charitable giving. Explain its purpose and your thoughts about it.
    7. What you can do to better manage your money.
  4. Explain the following to your merit badge counselor:
    1. The differences between saving and investing, including reasons for using one over the other.
    2. The concepts of return on investment and risk.
    3. The concepts of simple interest and compound interest and how these affected the results of your investment exercise.
  5. Select five publicly traded stocks from the business section of the newspaper. In written form, explain the importance of the following information for each stock:

    1. Current price

    2. How much the price changed from the previous day

    3. The 52-week high and the 52-week low prices

  6. Pretend you have $1,000 to save, invest, and help prepare yourself for the future. Explain to your merit badge counselor the advantages or disadvantages of saving or investing in each of the following :
    1. Common stocks
    2. Mutual funds
    3. Life insurance
    4. A certificate of deposit (CD)
    5. A savings account or U.S. savings bond
  7. Explain to your merit badge counselor the following:
    1. What a loan is, what interest is, and how the annual percentage rate (APR) measures the true cost of a loan.
    2. The different ways to borrow money.
    3. The differences between a charge card, debit card, and credit card. What are the costs and pitfalls of using these financial tools? Explain why it is unwise to make only the minimum payment on your credit card.
    4. Credit reports and how personal responsibility can affect your credit report.
    5. Ways to reduce or eliminate debt.
  8. Demonstrate in writing your understanding of time management by doing the following:

    1. Write a “to do” list of tasks or activities, such as homework assignments, chores, and personal projects, that must be done in the coming week. List these in order of importance to you.

    2. Make a seven-day calendar or schedule. Put in your set activities, such as school classes, sports practices or games, jobs or chores, and/or Scout or church or club meetings, then plan when you will do all the tasks from your “to do” list between your set activities.

    3. Follow the one-week schedule you planned. Keep a daily diary or journal during each of the seven days of this week’s activities, writing down when you completed each of the tasks on your “to do” list compared to when you scheduled them.

    4. Review your “to do” list, one-week schedule, and diary/journal to understand when your schedule worked and when it did not work. With your merit badge counselor, discuss and understand what you learned from this requirement and what you might do differently the next time.
  9. Prepare a written project plan demonstrating the steps below, including the desired outcome. This is a project on paper, not a real-life project. Examples could include planning a camping trip, developing a community service project or a school or religious event, or creating an annual patrol plan with additional activities not already included in the troop annual plan. Discuss your completed project plan with your merit badge counselor.

    1. Define the project. What is your goal?

    2. Develop a time line for your project that shows the steps you must take from beginning to completion.

    3. Describe your project.

    4. Develop a list of resources. Identify how these resources will help you achieve your goal.

    5. If necessary, develop a budget for your project.

  10. Do the following:

    1. Choose a career you might want to enter after high school or college graduation.

    2. Research the limitations of your anticipated career and prepare in writing what you have learned about qualifications such as education, skills, and experience.

 

Programming

Programming Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Safety. Do the following:
    1. Show your counselor your current, up-to-date Cyber Chip.
      ** (All requirements for the Cyber Chip, except #1, must be completed prior to Merit Badge College. See ** sections below and meet the requirements for the grade level you are currently in )
    2. Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries or illnesses that could occur during programming activities, including repetitive stress injuries and eyestrain.
  2. History. Do the following:
    1. Write a brief history of programming, including at least three milestones related to the advancement or development of programming.
    2. Describe in writing the evolution of programming methods and how they have improved over time.
  3. General knowledge. Do the following:
    1. Create a list of 10 popular programming languages in use today and describe in writing which industry or industries they are primarily used in and why.
    2. Describe in writing three different programmed devices you rely on every day.
  4. Intellectual property. Do the following:
    1. Explain in writing how software patents and copyrights protect a programmer.
    2. Describe in writing the difference between licensing and owning software.
    3. Describe in writing the differences between freeware, open source, and commercial software, and why it is important to respect the terms of use of each.
  5. Projects. Do the following:
    (Although much of this requirement will be done at Merit Badge College, please visit, with parent permission, the Programming merit badge website, http://www.boyslife.org/programming, which has a number of sample programs that you should familiarize yourself with before the class.)
    1. With your counselor’s approval, choose a sample program. Then, as a minimum, modify the code or add a function or subprogram to it. Debug and demonstrate the modified program to your counselor.
    2. With your counselor’s approval, choose a second programming language and development environment, different from those used for requirement 5a and in a different industry from 5a. Then write, debug, and demonstrate a functioning program to your counselor, using that language and environment.
    3. With your counselor’s approval, choose a third programming language and development environment, different from those used for requirements 5a and 5b and in a different industry from 5a or 5b. Then write, debug, and demonstrate a functioning program to your counselor, using that language and environment.
    4. Explain in writing how the programs you wrote for requirements 5a, 5b, and 5c process inputs, how they make decisions based on those inputs, and how they provide outputs based on the decision making.
  6. Careers. Find out about three career opportunities in programming. Pick one and write about the education, training, and experience required. Discuss this with your counselor and write down why this career might be of interest to you.

 

** Cyber Chip Requirements for Grades 6-8

  1. Read and sign the Level II Internet Safety Pledge from NetSmartz.
    (BSA Cyber Chip green card) (Cards will be available at Merit Badge College for you to sign)
  2. Write and sign a personalized contract with your parent or guardian that outlines rules for using the computer and mobile devices, including what you can download, what you can post, and consequences for inappropriate use.
  3. Watch the video “Friend or Fake,” along with two additional videos of your choosing, to see how friends can help each other to stay safe online. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting )
  4. As an individual or with your patrol, use the EDGE method and mini lessons to teach Internet safety rules, behavior, and “netiquette” to your troop or another patrol. You are encouraged to use any additional material and information you have researched. Each member of the patrol must have a role and present part of the lesson. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting )
  5. Discuss with your unit leader the acceptable standards and practices for using allowed electronic devices, such as phones and games, at your meetings and other Scouting events.

**Cyber Chip Requirements for Grades 9-12

  1. Read and sign the Level II Internet Safety Pledge. (BSA Cyber Chip green card)
    ​(Cards will be available at Merit Badge College for you to sign)
  2. Write and sign a personalized contract with your parent or guardian that outlines rules for using the computer and mobile devices, including what you can download, what you can post, and consequences for inappropriate use.
  3. Discuss with your parents the benefits and potential dangers teenagers might experience when using social media. Give examples of each.
  4. Watch three “Real-Life Story” videos to learn the impact on teens. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting)
  5. As an individual or patrol, use the EDGE method and the Teen Volunteer Kit to teach Internet safety rules, behavior, and “netiquette” to your troop or another patrol. You are encouraged to use any additional material and information you have researched. Each member of the patrol must have a role and present part of the lesson. (www.netsmartz.org/scouting)
  6. Discuss with your unit leader the acceptable standards and practices for using allowed electronic devices such as phones and games at your meetings and other Scouting events.

*Note: All Cyber Chips will expire annually. Each Scout will need to “recharge” the chip by going back to the Netsmartz Recharge area. This space will hold new information, news, and a place for the Scout to recommit to net safety and netiquette. Then, with the unit leader, the Scout can add the new date to the Cyber Chip card or certificate.

 

Radio

Radio Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Explain in writing what radio is. Include in your explanation:

    1. The differences between broadcast radio and hobby radio

    2. The differences between broadcasting and two-way communications

    3. Radio station call signs and how they are used in broadcast radio and amateur radio

    4. The phonetic alphabet and how it is used to communicate clearly

  2. Do the following:

    1. Sketch a diagram showing how radio waves travel locally and around the world. Explain how the broadcast radio stations WWV and WWVH can be used to help determine what you will hear when you listen to a shortwave radio.

    2. Explain the difference between a DX and a local station. Discuss what the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) does and how it is different from the International Telecommunication Union.

  3. Do the following

    1. Draw a chart of the electromagnetic spectrum covering 100 kilohertz (kHz) to 1000 megahertz (MHz).

    2. Label the MF, HF, VBF, UHF, and microwave portions of the spectrum on your diagram.

    3. Locate on your chart at least eight radio services, such as AM and FM commercial broadcast, citizens band (CB), television, amateur radio (at least four amateur radio bands), and public service (police and fire).

  4. Explain in writing how radio waves carry information. Include in your explanation: transceiver, transmitter, receiver, amplifier, and antenna.

  5. Do the following:

    1. Explain the differences between a block diagram and a schematic diagram.

    2. Draw a block diagram for a radio station that includes a transceiver, amplifier, microphone, antenna, and feed line.

    3. Explain the differences between an open circuit, a closed circuit, and a short circuit.

    4. Draw eight schematic symbols. Explain what three of the represented parts do. Find three electrical components to match to three of these symbols.

  6. Explain the safety precautions for working with radio gear, including the concept of grounding for direct current circuits, power outlets, and antenna systems.
  7. Visit a radio installation (an amateur radio station, broadcast station, or public service communications center, for example) approved in advance by your counselor. Discuss what types of equipment you saw in use, how it was used, what types of licenses are required to operate and maintain the equipment, and the purpose of the station.
  8. Find out about three career opportunities in radio. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Submit a written report and include why this profession might interest you.

  9. Do following: (MBC will be doing Requirement 9b)
    1. In Broadcast radio
      1. Prepare a program schedule for radio station "KBSA" of exactly one-half hour, including music, news, commercials, and proper station identification. Record your program on audiotape or in a digital audio format, using proper techniques.
      2. Listen to and properly log fifteen broadcast stations. Determine the program format and target audience for five of these stations.
      3. Explain at least eight terms used in commercial broadcasting, such as segue, cut, fade, continuity, remote, Emergency Alert Systam, network, cue, dead air, PSA, and playlist.
Robotics

Railroading Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

REQUIRES an additional $10.00 LAB FEE
  1. Do the following:
    a. List three types of modern freight trains. Explain in writing why unit trains are more efficient than mixed freight trains.
    c. Using models or pictures, identify 10 types of railroad freight or passenger cars. Explain in writing the purpose of each type of car.

    d. Explain how a modern diesel or electric locomotive develops power. Explain the terms dynamic braking and radial steering trucks.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Explain the purpose and formation of Amtrak. Explain, by the use of a timetable, a plan for making a trip by rail between two cities at least 500 miles apart. List the times of departure and arrival at your destination, the train number, and the type of service you want.
    2. List and explain the various forms of public/mass transit using rail.
  3. Do the following:
    1. In writing, name four departments of a railroad company and describe what each department does.
  4. Explain the purpose of Operation Lifesaver and its mission.
  5. Do THREE of the following:
    a. List five safety precautions that help make trains safer for workers and passengers and why each is important.
    c. List 10 safety tips to remember when you are near a railroad track (either on the ground or on a station platform) or aboard a train.
    e. Write down what an automobile driver can do to safely operate a car at grade crossings, and list three things an automobile driver should never do at a grade crossing.
  6. Explain the appearance and meaning of the following warning signs and devices: advance warning sign, pavement markings, crossbucks, flashing red lights, crossing gates.
  7. Do EACH of the following:
    1. Explain how railroad signals operate and show two basic signal types using color or configuration.
    2. Explain the meaning of three horn signals.
    3. Describe a way to signal a train for an emergency stop.
    4. Explain the use and function of the EOTD (end-of-train device) or FRED (flashing rear end device) used on the last car of most trains.
  8. a. Model Railroading Do two of the following:
    1. Draw a layout of your own model railroad or one that could be built in your home. Design a point-to-point track or loop with different routings. Include one of the following: turnaround or terminal or yard or siding.
    3. Name the scale of four popular model railroad gauges. Identify the scale of four model cars or locomotives.
    5. Build one railroad structure (from scratch or using a kit), paint and weather the structure, mount it on your layout or diorama, and make the surrounding area on the diorama scenic.
    7. Participate in a switching contest on a timesaver layout and record your time.
Robotics

Robotics Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

SPECIAL NOTE: A robot kit is required for this badge… The Northeastern PA Council has 8 Lego Mindstorms EV3 kits for scouts to borrow on a first-come-first-served basis. These must be picked up approximately 1 month before Merit Badge College, and returned the day of the class. Contact Mr. David Srebro at the Service Center (570-207-1227 x225 / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) for information on borrowing a kit. If you have your own, approved kit, please do not borrow one. This will allow more scouts to participate in the badge and you will not have to pay the $20 lab fee. If you have your own robot kit, please contact Mr. Srebro 1 month before the class about this to make sure it will meet the merit badge requirements. You will not be able to participate in the course if you do not do this.

  1. Safety. Do each of the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while working with robots and what you should do to anticipate, mitigate and prevent, and respond to these hazards. Describe the appropriate safety gear and clothing that should be used when working with robotics.
    2. Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries that could occur while participating in robotics activities and competitions, including cuts, eye injuries, and burns (chemical or heat).
  2. Robotics industry. Do the following:
    1. List the kinds of things robots can do and write about how robots are best used today.
    2. Make a chart listing similarities and differences between remote-control vehicles, telerobots, and autonomous robots.
    3. Write about three different methods robots can use to move themselves other than wheels or tracks, and when it would be appropriate to use each method (Your report should have a paragraph explaining how each method you chose works. This will help you pass the requirement to tell when it is appropriate to use the methods).
  3. General knowledge. Briefly write about three of the five major fields of robotics (human-robot interface, mobility, manipulation, programming, sensors) and their importance to robotics development. Write about either the three fields as they relate to a single robot system OR briefly write about each field in general. Find pictures or at least one video to aid your written work. (You may print the photos out or bring a video on a USB thumb drive to share. You should have approximately one double-spaced page of writing for each of your selected fields.)
  4. Design, build, program, test. Do each of the following:
    1. With your counselor’s approval, choose a task for the robot or robotic subsystem that you plan to build. Include sensor feedback and programming in the task. Document this information in your robot engineering notebook. (About one month before Merit Badge College, you must contact the counselor, Dr. Klassner, to talk for 10-15 minutes to let him know the task you want to choose. Contact Mr. Srebro at the Service Center to obtain Dr. Klassner’s direct contact information.)
    2. Design your robot. The robot design should use sensors and programming and have at least 2 degrees of freedom. Document the design in your robot engineering notebook using drawings and a written description. (You will be able to make changes to your design and/or robot during class, but you must bring a design already written up in your notebook to start.)
    3. Build a robot or robotic subsystem of your original design to accomplish the task you chose for requirement 4a. (You do not need to program the robot beforehand. We will study robot design and programming at Merit Badge College and you will be able to make changes to your design/robot and to program it during class.)Discuss with your counselor the programming options available for your robot. Then do either option 1 OR option 2.
      1. Option 1. Program your robot to perform the task you chose for your robot in 4a. Include a sample of your program’s source code in your robot engineering notebook.
      2. Option 2. Prepare a flowchart of the desired steps to program your robot for accomplishing the task in 4a. Include procedures that show activities based on sensor inputs. Place this in your robot engineering notebook.
    4. Test your robot and record the results in your robot engineering notebook. Include suggestions on how you could improve your robot, as well as pictures or sketches of your finished robot. (During your talk with Dr. Klassner, you will be told to find two or three robot designs on the web that might accomplish the task in requirement 4a, and compare your design with them in your notebook.)
  5. Demonstrate. Do the following:
    1. Demonstrate for your counselor the robot you built in requirement 4.
    2. Share your robot engineering notebook with your counselor. Talk about how well your robot accomplished the task, the improvements you would make in your next design, and what you learned about the design process. (You must bring your notebook with you to the class. Expect to add to it before you share it with the counselor during class.)
  6. Competitions. Do ONE of the following.
    1. Attend a robotics competition and write a report about what you saw and learned about the competition and how teams are organized and managed.
    2. Learn about three youth robotics competitions. Write a brief summary about each of these, including the type of competition, time commitment, age of the participants, and how many teams are involved.
  7. Careers. List three career opportunities in robotics. Pick one and write about the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and write about why this profession might interest you. (You should plan to write approximately a page about the career you selected.)
Scholarship

Scholarship Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Do ONE of the following: (bring verification)

    1. Show that you have had an average grade of B or higher (80 percent or higher) for one term or semester.

    2. Show that for one term or semester you have improved your school grades over the previous period.

  2. Do TWO of the following and submit in written form:

    1. Make a list of educational places located where you live (other than schools). Visit one, and report in writing on how you used the place for self-education.

    2. With your parent’s approval, interview two professionals (other than teachers or other professionals at your school) with established careers. Find out where they were educated, what training they received, and how their education and training have helped prepare them for the career they have chosen. Find out how they continue to educate themselves. Write a report of your findings.

    3. Using a daily planner, show your counselor how you keep track of assignments and activities, and report in writing how you manage your time. Bring your daily planner and report to Merit Badge College.

    4. Discuss in writing the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of research available to you for school assignments, such as the library, books and periodicals, and the Internet.

  3. Get a note from the principal of your school (or another school official named by the principal) that states that during the past year your behavior, leadership, and service have been satisfactory.

  4. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Show that you have taken part in an extracurricular school activity, and write a report about the benefits of participation and what you learned about the importance of teamwork.

    2. Write a report about your participation in a school project during the past semester where you were a part of a team. As part of the report, tell about the positive contributions you made to the team and the project.

  5. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Write a report of 250 to 300 words about how the education you receive in school will be of value to you in the future and how you will continue to educate yourself in the future.

    2. Write a report of 250 to 300 words about two careers that interest you and how specific classes and good scholarship in general will help you achieve your career goals.

 

Scouting Heritage

Scouting Heritage
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.

  1. Discuss with your counselor the life and times of Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell. Explain why he felt a program like Scouting would be good for the young men of his day. Include in your discussion how Scouting was introduced in the United States, and the origins of Boy Scouting and Cub Scouting under Baden-Powell.
  2. In writing, do the following:
    1. Give a short biographical summary of any TWO of the following, and tell of their roles in how Scouting developed and grew in the United States prior to 1940.
      1. Daniel Carter Beard
      2. William D. Boyce
      3. Waite Phillips
      4. Ernest Thompson Seton
      5. James E. West
    2. Discuss the significance to Scouting of any TWO of the following:
      1. Brownsea Island
      2. The First World Scout Jamboree
      3. Boy Scout Handbook
      4. Boys’ Life magazine
  3. Discuss with your counselor how Scouting’s programs have developed over time and been adapted to fit different age groups and interests (Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Exploring, Venturing).
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Attend either a BSA national jamboree, OR world Scout jamboree, OR a national BSA high-adventure base. While there, keep a journal documenting your day-to-day experiences. Upon your return, report to your counselor what you did, saw, and learned. You may include photos, brochures, and other documents in your report. Bring this report to Merit Badge College.
    2. Write or visit the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas.* Obtain information about this facility. Give a short report on what you think the role of this museum is in the Scouting program. Bring this report to Merit Badge College.
    3. Visit an exhibit of Scouting memorabilia or a local museum with a Scouting history gallery, or (with your parent’s permission and counselor’s approval) visit with someone in your council who is recognized as a dedicated Scouting historian or memorabilia collector. Learn what you can about the history of Boy Scouting. Give a short report to your counselor on what you saw and learned.
  5. Learn about the history of your unit or Scouting in your area. Interview at least two people (one from the past and one from the present) associated with your troop. These individuals could be adult unit leaders, Scouts, troop committee members, or representative of your troop’s chartered organization. Find out when your unit was originally chartered. Create a report of your findings on the history of your troop, and present it to your patrol or troop or at a court of honor, and then add it to the troop’s library. This presentation could be in the form of an oral/written report, an exhibit, a scrapbook, or a computer presentation such as a slide show. Bring this report to Merit Badge College along with a verification of this presentation signed by your Scoutmaster.
  6. Make a collection of some of your personal patches and other Scouting memorabilia. With their permission, you may include items borrowed from family members or friends who have been in Scouting in the past, or you may include photographs of these items. Bring this collection to Merit Badge College, and be prepared to share what you have learned about items in the collection. (There is no requirement regarding how large or small this collection must be.
  7. Reproduce and bring to Merit Badge College the equipment for an old-time Scouting game such as those played at Brownsea Island. You may find one on your own (with your counselor’s approval), or pick one from the Scouting Heritage merit badge pamphlet. Be prepared to teach and play the game with other Scouts.
  8. Interview at least three people (different from those you interviewed for requirement 5) over the age of 40 who were Scouts. Find out about their Scouting experiences. Ask about the impact that Scouting has had on their lives. In a written report, share what you learned with your counselor.
Sports

Sports Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

Important Note: Scouts need to bring to Merit Badge College written certification from their coach of the completion of Requirement #4 along with requirements 4a, 4b, and 4c in written form. Scouts will only receive a complete for Requirement #5 if they have written certification of completion of this requirement from a Sports Merit Badge Counselor or coach. This written certification of completion along with requirements 5a and 5c in written form must be brought to Merit Badge College. Scouts will only receive a partial for this merit badge at Merit Badge College without these written certifications of completion and written requirements and will need to follow up with a Sports Merit Badge Counselor after Merit Badge College in order to complete this badge.

Note: The activities used to fulfill the requirements for the Sports merit badge may not be used to help fulfill requirements for other merit badges.

  1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while playing sports, including sprains, strains, contusions, abrasions, fractures, blisters, muscle cramps, dehydration, heat and cold reactions, injured teeth, nausea, and suspected injuries to the head, neck and back.
  2. Explain the importance of the following:
    1. The importance of the physical exam
    2. The importance of maintaining good health habits for life (such as exercising regularly), and how the use of tobacco products, alcohol, and other harmful substances can negatively affect your health and your performance in sports activities
    3. The importance of maintaining a healthy diet
  3. Discuss the following:
    1. The importance of warming up and cooling down
    2. The importance of weight training
    3. What an amateur athlete is and the differences between an amateur and a professional athlete
    4. The attributes (qualities) of a good sport, the importance of sportsmanship, and the traits of a good team leader and player who exhibits Scout spirit on and off the playing field.
  4. Take part for one season (or four months) as a competitive individual or as a member of an organized team in TWO of the following sports: baseball, basketball, bowling, cross-country, field hockey, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, softball, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo. Your counselor may approve in advance other recognized sports, but not any sport that is restricted and not authorized by the Boy Scouts of America. Then with your chosen sports do the following and bring in writing to Merit Badge College:

    1. Give the rules and etiquette for the two sports you picked.

    2. List the equipment needed for the two sports you chose. Describe the protective equipment and appropriate clothing (if any) and explain why it is needed.

    3. Draw diagrams of the playing areas for your two sports.

  5. With guidance from your counselor or coach, establish a personal training program suited to the activities you chose for requirement 4. Then do the following:

    1. Organize a chart to track your training, practice, and development in these sports for one season (or four months).

    2. Demonstrate proper technique for your two chosen sports.

    3. At the end of the season, share your completed chart with your counselor and discuss how your participation in the sports has affected you mentally and physically.

 

Swimming

Swimming Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

SEND COPY OF CURRENT CPR CARD WITH YOUR REGISTRATION

  1. Describe in writing the prevention of and treatment for health concerns that could occur while swimming, including hypothermia, dehydration, sunburn, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, muscle cramps, hyperventilation, spinal injury, stings and bites, and cuts and scrapes.

  2. Do the following:
    1. Identify the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Explain how to recognize such conditions.
    2. Demonstrate proper technique for performing CPR using a training device approved by your counselor.
  3. Before doing the following requirements, successfully complete Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c and First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c. (Bring your signed Boy Scout Handbook)

    Second Class rank requirements 7a through 7c:
    (7a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
    (7b) Demonstrate your ability to jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.
    (7c) Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, by reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.

    First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c:
    (9a) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
    (9b) Before doing the following requirement, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test: Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
    (9c) With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.

  4. Demonstrate survival skills by jumping feetfirst into deep water wearing clothes (shoes, socks, swim trunks, long pants, belt, and long sleeved shirt). Remove shoes and socks, inflate the shirt, and show that you can float using the shirt for support. Remove and inflate the pants. Swim 50 feet using the inflated pants for support, then show how to reinflate the pants while still afloat. (Bring specified clothing.)
  5. Swim continuously for 150 yards using the following strokes in good form and in a strong manner: front crawl or trudgen for 25 yards, back crawl for 25 yards, sidestroke for 25 yards, breast-stroke for 25 yards, and elementary backstroke for 50 yards.
  6. Do the following:
    1. Float faceup in a resting position for at least one minute.
    2. Demonstrate survival floating for at least five minutes.
    3. While wearing a properly fitted personal flotation device (PFD), demonstrate the HELP and huddle positions. Explain their purposes.
    4. Explain why swimming or survival floating will hasten the onset of hypothermia in cold water.
  7. In water over your head, but not to exceed 10 feet, do each of the following:
    1. Use the feetfirst method of surface diving and bring an object up from the bottom.
    2. Do a headfirst surface dive (pike or tuck) and bring the object up again.
    3. Do a headfirst surface dive to a depth of at least 5 feet and swim underwater for three strokes. Come to the surface, take a breath, and repeat the sequence twice.
  8. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Demonstrate snorkeling and scuba diving knowledge: (If you have your own snorkeling gear, please bring.)
      1. Demonstrate selection and fit of mask, snorkel, and fins; discuss safety in both pool and open-water snorkeling.
      2. Demonstrate proper use of mask, snorkel, and fins for underwater search and rescue.
      3. Be prepared to describe the sport of scuba diving or snorkeling, and demonstrate your knowledge of BSA policies and procedures relating to that sport.

    2. OR (Only if you are a skilled competitive swimmer)
    3. Demonsrate the following competitive swimming skills:
      1. Racing dive from a pool edge or dock edge (no elevated dives from racing platforms or starting blocks) 
      2. Racing form for 25 yards on one competitive stroke (front crawl, back crawl, breaststroke, or butterfly)
      3. Racing turns for the stroke that you chose in 8b(2), OR, if the camp facilities cannot accommodate the racing turn, repeat 8b(2) with an additional stroke.
      4. Be prepared to describe the sport of competitive swimming.

  9. Following the guidelines set in the BSA Safe Swim Defense, in water at least 7 feet deep, show a standing headfirst dive from a dock or pool deck. Show a long shallow dive, also from the dock or pool deck.
  10. Do the following:

    1. Explain in writing the health benefits of regular aerobic exercise, and explain why many people today do not get enough of the beneficial kinds of exercise.

    2. Describe in writing why swimming is favored as both a fitness and a therapeutic exercise.

    3. Write a plan for a swimming exercise program that will promote aerobic/vascular fitness, strength and muscle tone, body flexibility, and weight control for a person of Scout age. Identify resources and facilities available in your home community that would be needed for such a program.

    4. Describe in writing the incentives and obstacles for staying with the fitness program you identified in requirement 10(c). Explain in writing the unique benefits that could be gained from this program, and how personal health awareness and self-discipline would relate to your own willingness and ability to pursue such a program.

 

Veterinary Medicine

Veterinary Medicine
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

  1. Describe in writing the roles a veterinarian plays in the following:

    1. Companion or small animal medicine, and equine medicine

    2. Food animal or large animal medicine

    3. Exotic animal medicine

    4. Marine animal medicine (mammal and fish)

    5. Poultry medicine

    6. Wildlife medicine and aquaculture medicine

  2. Describe in writing the roles a veterinarian plays in the following:

    1. Public health medicine and zoonotic disease surveillance and control

    2. The military

    3. Food safety and inspection 

    4. Laboratory animal medicine and research

    5. Teaching and government

  3. Describe in writing the training required to become a veterinarian. Where is the veterinary medical college nearest you? Describe the prerequisites for applying to veterinary school.

  4. Tell your counselor what a registered veterinary technician (R.T.V.) or animal health technician (A.H.T.) is. Describe the training required to become an R.V.T. or A.H.T. Where is the school or facility for R.V.T. or A.H.T. training nearest you? Describe the role an R.V.T. or A.H.T. would play in assisting a veterinarian working in three of the practice types listed in requirement 1.
  5. Discuss with your merit badge counselor the role a veterinarian plays in the human-animal bond.
  6. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit a veterinary clinic, hospital, or veterinary referral teaching hospital that does work in one of the practices listed in requirement 1. Spend as much time as you can observing the veterinarians and their staff. Write a report on what you observed and learned at the facility. Share you report with your counselor.
    2. Spend as much time as possible with a veterinarian who works in one of the fields listed in requirement 2. Learn what special training beyond veterinary medical school may have been required for that position. Learn about any special or unusual activities required of this position. Write a report on what you have learned about this field of veterinary medicine. Include in your report how this field serves the needs of the general public. Share your report with your counselor.
Welding

Welding
Merit Badge

Download Requirements/Workbook HERE
(Microsoft Word *.doc file)

NOTE: This merit badge has prerequisite requirements that MUST be emailed in prior to Merit Badge College.  See "IMPORTANT NOTICE" at the right.
REQUIRES an additional $10.00 LAB FEE

  1. Do the following:
    1. List and explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while welding, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, or lessen these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for, and the prevention of, injuries or illnesses that could occur while welding, including electrical shock, eye injuries, burns, fume inhalation, dizziness, skin irritation, and exposure to hazardous chemicals, including filler metals and welding gases.
  2. Do the following:
    1. With your counselor, list and discuss general safety precautions and Material Safety Data Sheets related to welding. Explain in writing the importance of the MSDS.
    2. List and describe the appropriate safety gear and clothing that must be worn when welding. Then, present yourself properly dressed for welding – in protective equipment, clothing, and footwear.
    3. Explain in writing and demonstrate the proper care and storage of welding equipment, tools, and protective clothing and footwear.
  3. Explain in writing the terms welding, electrode, slag, and oxidation. Describe in writing the welding process, how heat is generated, what kind of filler metal is added (if any), and what protects the molten metal from the atmosphere.
  4. In writing, name the different mechanical and thermal cutting methods. Choose one method and describe in writing how to use the process. Discuss in your writing one advantage and one limitation of this process.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Select two welding processes, and make a list of the different components of the equipment required for each process. Discuss in writing one advantage and one limitation for each process.
    2. Choose one welding process. Set up the process you have chosen, including gas regulators, work clamps, cables, filler materials, and equipment settings. Have your counselor inspect and approve the area for the welding process you have chosen.
  6. After successfully completing requirements 1 through 5, use the equipment you prepared for the welding process in 5b to do the following:
    1. Using a metal scribe or soapstone, sketch your initial onto a metal plate, and weld a bead on the plate following the pattern of your initial.
    2. Cover a small plate (approximately 3” x 3” x ¼”) with weld beads side by side.
    3. Tack two plates together in a square groove butt joint.
    4. Weld the two plates together from 6c on both sides.
    5. Tack two plates together in a T joint, have your counselor inspect it, then weld a T joint with fillet weld on both sides.
    6. Tack two plates together in a lap joint, have your counselor inspect it, then weld a lap joint with fillet weld on both sides.
  7. Do the following and present in written form:
    1. Find out about three career opportunities in the welding industry. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why the profession might interest you.
    2. Discuss the role of the American Welding Society in the welding profession.

 

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