Council
Description and Support

Required for Eagle - "Be Prepared" is our motto, but how exactly do you do that? Our counselors can help you get ready for anything and learn the important skills that go with this badge. Knowledge is the father of confidence.

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Great location for doing a disaster drill.
  • Additional support and background materials.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Earn the First Aid Merit Badge.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Discuss with your counselor the aspects of emergency preparedness:
      1. Prepare for emergency situations
      2. Respond to emergency situations
      3. Recover from emergency situations
      4. Mitigate and prevent emergency situations
        Include in your discussion the kinds of questions that are important to ask yourself as you consider each of these.
    2. Make a chart that demonstrates your understanding of each of the three aspects of emergency preparedness in requirement 2a (prepare, respond, recover, mitigate) with regard to 10 of the situations listed below. You must use situations 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 below in boldface but you may choose any other five listed here for a total of 10 situations. Discuss this chart with your counselor.
      1. Home kitchen fire
      2. Home basement/storage room/garage fire
      3. Explosion in the home
      4. Automobile accident
      5. Food-borne disease (food poisoning)
      6. Fire or explosion in a public place
      7. Vehicle stalled in the desert
      8. Vehicle trapped in a blizzard
      9. Flash flooding in town or in the country
      10. Mountain/backcountry accident
      11. Boating accident
      12. Gas leak in a home or a building
      13. Tornado or hurricane
      14. Major flood
      15. Nuclear power plant emergency
      16. Avalanche (snowslide or rockslide)
      17. Violence in a public place
    3. Meet with and teach your family how to get or build a kit, make a plan, and be informed for the situations on the chart you created for requirement 2b. Complete a family plan.
      Then meet with your counselor and report on your family meeting, discuss their responses, and share your family plan.
  3. Show how you could safely save a person from the following:
    1. Touching a live household electric wire.
    2. A room filled with carbon monoxide
    3. Clothes on fire.
    4. Drowning using nonswimming rescues (including accidents on ice).
  4. Show three ways of attracting and communicating with rescue planes/aircraft.
  5. With another person, show a good way to transport an injured person out of a remote and/or rugged area, conserving the energy of rescuers while ensuring the well-being and protection of the injured person.
  6. Do the following:
    1. Tell the things a group of Scouts should be prepared to do, the training they need , and the safety precautions they should take for the following emergency services:
      1. Crowd and traffic control
      2. Messenger service and communication.
      3. Collection and distribution services.
      4. Group feeding, shelter, and sanitation.
    2. Identify the government or community agencies that normally handle and prepare for the emergency services listed under 6a, and explain to your counselor how a group of Scouts could volunteer to help in the event of these types of emergencies.
    3. Find out who is your community's emergency management director and learn what this person does to prepare, respond to, recover from, and mitigate and prevent emergency situations in your community. Discuss this information with your counselor and apply what you discover to the chart you created for requirement 2b.
  7. Take part in an emergency service project, either a real one or a practice drill, with a Scouting unit or a community agency.
  8. Do the following:
    1. Prepare a written plan for mobilizing your troop when needed to do emergency service. If there is already a plan, explain it. Tell your part in making it work.
    2. Take part in at least one troop mobilization. Before the exercise, describe your part to your counselor. Afterward, conduct an "after-action" lesson, discussing what you learned during the exercise that required changes or adjustments to the plan.
    3. Prepare a personal emergency service pack for a mobilization call. Prepare a family kit (suitcase or waterproof box) for use by your family in case an emergency evacuation is needed. Explain the needs and uses of the contents.
  9. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Using a safety checklist approved by your counselor, inspect your home for potential hazards. Explain the hazards you find and how they can be corrected.
    2. Review or develop a plan of escape for your family in case of fire in your home.
    3. Develop an accident prevention program for five family activities outside the home (such as taking a picnic or seeing a movie) that includes an analysis of possible hazards, a proposed plan to correct those hazards, and the reasons for the corrections you propose.

Description and Support

Required for Eagle - Knock out this important badge in an environment close to home. Acahela and Goose Pond offer a variety of camping settings and can make getting this badge a lot easier.

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Conservation projects available on-site.
  • C.O.P.E. rappelling at GPSR or Acahela.
  • Terrific Scoutcraft areas for training.
  • Additional support and background materials.
  • Nearby to facilities to canoe, kayak, bike, hike, backpack, or other treks.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.
  2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.
  3. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member.
    2. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term "layering."
    2. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet.
    3. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding).
    4. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed.
    5. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.
  6. Do the following:
    1. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent.
    2. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water.
    3. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent.
    4. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    5. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.
  7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:
    1. Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed.
    2. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.
  8. Do the following:
    1. Explain the safety procedures for:
      1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove
      2. Using a liquid fuel stove
      3. Proper storage of extra fuel
    2. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves.
    3. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination.
    4. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.
  9. Show experience in camping by doing the following:
    1. Camp a total of at least 20 days and 20 nights. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. The 20 days and 20 nights must be at a designated Scouting activity or event. You may use a week of long-term camp toward this requirement. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent.
    2. On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision:
      1. Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet.
      2. Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles.
      3. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours.
      4. Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles.
      5. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience.
      6. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more.
    3. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency.
  10. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

Description and Support

With two top-class rivers and a terrific glacial pond, Acahela and Goose Pond are outstanding for fishing. Learn all about this great sport and hobby and how to do it right so you can get the most out of your expeditions.

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Great fishing in our rivers or ponds.
  • Some fishing equipment available on special request.
  • Additional support and background materials.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Explain to your counselor the injuries that could occur while fishing and the proper treatment, including cuts, scratches, puncture wounds, insect bites, hypothermia, dehydration, and heat reactions. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fishing.
  2. Learn and explain the differences between two types of fishing outfits. Point out and identify the parts of several types of rods and reels. Explain how and when each would be used. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of two different types of fishing equipment.
  4. Demonstrate how to tie the following knots: clinch, palomar, turle, blood loop (barrel knot), and surgeon's loop. Explain how each knot is used and when to use it.
  5. Name and identify five basic artificial lures and five natural baits and explain how to fish with them. Explain why bait fish are not to be released.
  6. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace and how it positively affects fishing resources.
  7. Give the regulations affecting game fishing where you live.
  8. Explain why they were adopted and what you accomplish by following those regulations. Explain what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to fishermen. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing sports enthusiast, including the aspects of littering, trespassing, courteous behavior, and obeying fishing regulations.
  9. Catch two different kinds of fish and identify them. Release at least one of them unharmed. Clean and cook another fish.

Description and Support

Add everything you learned in fishing and then add an entirely new set of dimensions to it by understanding the food chain, how to replicate the look of insects, tying flies, and learning the method and techniques involved in fly fishing. Find the Zone!

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Great fishing in our rivers or ponds.
  • Some fishing equipment may be available on special request.
  • Additional support and background materials.
  • Free fly-tying classes nearby (Camp Acahela only). Free computerized casting analysis (Camp Acahela only).

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Explain to your counselor the injuries that could occur while fly-fishing and the proper treatment, including cuts, scratches, puncture wounds, insect bites, hypothermia, and heat reactions. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fly-fishing.
  2. Discuss how to match a fly rod, line and leader to get a balanced system. Discuss several types of fly lines, and explain how and when each would be used. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment.
  3. Demonstrate how to tie proper knots to prepare a fly rod for fishing:
    1. Tie a backing to a fly reel spool using the arbor backing knot
    2. Attach backing to fly line using the nail knot
    3. Attach a leader to fly line using the needle knot, nail knot or loop-to-loop connection
    4. Add tippet to a leader using a double surgeon's loop or blood knot
    5. Tie a fly onto the terminal end of the leader using the improved clinch knot
  4. Explain how each of the following types of flies are used: dry flies, wet flies, nymphs, streamers, bass bugs, and poppers. What does each imitate? Tie at least two types of the flies mentioned in this requirement.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to cast a fly consistently and accurately using overhead and roll cast techniques.
  6. Go to a suitable fishing location and make observations on the types of insects fish may be eating. Look for flying insects and some that may be on or beneath the water's surface. Look under rocks. Explain the importance of matching the hatch.
  7. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace and how it positively affects fly-fishing resources.
  8. Obtain a copy of the regulations affecting game fishing where you live. Explain why they were adopted and what you accomplish by following them.
  9. Explain what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to fishermen. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing enthusiast, including the aspects of littering, trespassing, courteous behavior, and obeying fishing regulations.
  10. Using the fly-fishing techniques you have learned, catch two different kinds of fish and identify them. Release at least one of them unharmed. Clean and cook another fish.

 

Description and Support

Begin to learn all about our Native American ancestors and their beautiful culture with it's crafts, legends, and an enduring wisdom that our modern society could really use a healthy dose of. This isn't about museum history, it's about who we really are as Americans.

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Near-by Pocono Indian Museum.
  • Indian craft can be taught.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

Requirement 4e used to require "an Indian story of at least 300 words, or any number of shorter ones adding up to 300 words." We believe, but have not confirmed, that the change from 300 words to 25 words as shown below was a typographical error in the pamphlet, but until we get confirmation from BSA, we've shown the wording in the pamphlet.

  1. Give the history of one American Indian tribe, group or nation that lives or has lived near you. Visit it, if possible. Tell about traditional dwellings, way of life, tribal government, religious beliefs, family and clan relationships, language, clothing styles, arts and crafts, food preparation, means of getting around, games, customs in warfare, where members of the group now live, and how they live.
  2. Do TWO of the following. Focus on a specific group or tribe.
    1. Make an item of clothing worn by members of the tribe.
    2. Make and decorate three items used by the tribe, as approved by your counselor.
    3. Make an authentic model of a dwelling used by an Indian tribe, group, or nation.
    4. Visit a museum to see Indian artifacts. Discuss them with your counselor. Identify at least 10 artifacts by tribe or nation, their shape, size, and use.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Learn three games played by a group or tribe. Teach and lead one game with a Scout group.
    2. Learn and show how a tribe traditionally cooked or prepared food. Make three food items.
    3. Give a demonstration showing how a specific Indian group traditionally hunted, fished, or trapped.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Write or briefly describe how life would have been different for the European settlers if there had been no native Americans to meet them when they came to this continent.
    2. Sing two songs in an Indian language. Explain their meanings.
    3. Learn in an Indian language at least 25 common terms and their meaning.
    4. Show 25 signs in Indian sign language. Include those that will help you ask for water, for food, and where the path or road leads.
    5. Learn in English (or the language you commonly speak at home or in the troop) an Indian story of at least 25 words, or any number of shorter ones adding up to 300 words. Tell the story or stories at a Scout meeting or campfire.
    6. Write or tell about eight things adopted by others from American Indians.
    7. Learn 25 Indian place names. Tell their origins and meanings.
    8. Name five well-known American Indian leaders, either from the past or people of today. Give their tribes or nations. Describe what they did or do now that makes them notable.
    9. Learn about the Iroquois Confederacy, including how and why it was formed. Tell about its governing system. Describe some of the similarities and differences between the governments of the United States and of the Six Nations (the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy).

 

Description and Support

Models help people see how things work, what they do, and what they will look like. But how do you get something boiled down into miniature and still look real? Model Building will help you see with a whole new set of eyes!

Support provided:

Frequently this Merit Badge becomes a real "stumper" because our youth don't get the model building skills or hand craft skills that used to be taught in schools or at home. Parents and other adults are frequently at a loss as to explaining how to build a kit model let alone the kinds of models discussed here. So to better support this Badge, we can hold a special Special Model Building Workshop where boys can learn all the various techniques that will come in handy for completing this Badge.

Additional Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Study and understand the requirements for personal safety when using such modelmaker hand tools such as: knives, handsaws, vices, files, hammers, screwdrivers, hand drills and drill bits, pliers, and portable power tools, and when to use protective equipment such as goggles when grinding or drilling. Know what precautions to take when using flammable or hazardous products such as: glue, epoxy, paint, thinners. Discuss these with your counselor before you begin your model-making project and tell why they are important.
  2. Explain the uses for each of the following types of models: architectural, structural, process, mechanical, and industrial. Do research into the different types of materials that could be used in making these models.
  3. With your counselor's advice, select a subject from requirement 4 for your model project (no kits). Prepare the necessary plans to the proper scale, a list of materials to be used, and a list of the required tools. This model should be your own original work. Tell why you selected this subject.
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Make an architectural model. Build a model of a house to a scale of 1/4"=1'0" (50:1 metric). Discuss with your counselor the materials you intend to use, the amount of detail required, outside treatment (finish, shrubbery, walks, etc.) and color selections. After completing the model, present it to your counselor for approval.
    2. Build a structural model. Construct a model showing corner construction of a wood frame building to a scale of 1 1/2"=1'0" (8:1 Metric). All structures shown must be to scale. Cardboard or flat sheet wood stock may be used for sheeting or flooring on the model. Review with your counselor the problems you encountered in gathering the materials and supporting the structure. Be able to name the parts of the floor and wall frames, such as intermediate girder, joist, bridging, subfloor, sill, sole plate, stud and rafter.
    3. Make a process model. Build a model showing the plumbing system in your house. Show hot and cold water supply, all waste returns, and venting to a scale of 3/4"=1'0" (15:1 Metric). Talk to your counselor about how to begin this model, and present the scale and the materials you will use. After completion, present the model to your counselor and be prepared to discuss any problems you had building this model.
    4. Complete a mechanical model. Build a model of a mechanical device that uses at least two of the six simple machines. After completing the the model, present it to your counselor. Be prepared to discuss materials used, the machine's function, and any particular difficulty you may have encountered.
    5. Make an industrial model. Build a model of an actual passenger-carrying vehicle to a scale of 1"=1'0" or ½" = 1'0" (10:1 or 25:1 Metric). Take the dimensions of the vehicle, and record the important dimensions. Draw the top, front, rear, and sides of the vehicle to scale. From your plans, build a model of the vehicle to scale. From your plans, build a model of the vehicle and finish in a craftsmanlike manner. Discuss with your counselor the most difficult part of completing the model.
  5. Build a special-effects model of a fantasy spacecraft that might appear in a Hollywood science-fiction movie. Determine an appropriate scale for your design - one that makes practical sense. Include a cockpit or control area, living space, storage unit, engineering spaces, and propulsion systems. As you plan and build your model, do the following
    1. Study aircraft, submarines, and naval ships for design ideas.
    2. Arrange and assemble the parts.
    3. Sketch your completed model.
    4. Write a short essay in which you discuss your design, scale, and materials choices. Describe how you engineered your model and discuss any difficulties you encountered and what you learned.
  6. List at least six occupations in which modelmaking is used and discuss with your counselor some career opportunities in this field.

 

Description and Support

This unique workshop is designed to help prepare boys for being able to complete their Model Building and Design or Railroading Merit Badges.

The workshop is an indoor, full day class that covers all sorts of modeling techniques that will not only help you get your merit badge, but help you get more enjoyment out of building all sorts of models.

Topics Covered:

  1. Types of modeling: kit building, kit bashing, conversions, scratchbuilding (Includes a selection of award winning models)
  2. Basic tools and techniques (Includes clipping, cutting, and sanding exercises)
  3. Adhesives and how to use them (Includes gluing demo and contest)
  4. Preparing a model for painting
  5. How to paint a model: Spray painting, brush painting, airbrushing (includes painting demo and contest)
  6. Demystifying decalling
  7. Making it look real (and all about visual cues)
  8. 10 keys to building a better model (Includes "10 Techs" Round Robin)
  9. "Seeing" parts differently (Includes "Breakdown" Game)
  10. Creative "Imagineering"
  11. Special Techniques (Includes Sprue Stretching Contest)

Unit leaders will be provided with all the materials needed to do each course including leader's briefs that explain each activity so that you can answer any of your Scout's questions. Additional Camp Staff leadership can be provided if you feel additional help is needed.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela (and is under development at Goose Pond).

This Award can be completed in one or two weekends, depending on the effort applied by the unit.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Sorry, no patches are available for this activity at this time.

Description and Support

OK, trains around the Christmas Tree are cool, but there is much more to trains than that. It's all about moving millions of tons of freight and thousands of people from point to point, quickly and efficiently. Find out how.

Support provided:

Frequently this Merit Badge becomes a real "stumper" because our youth don't get the model building skills or hand craft skills that used to be taught in schools or at home. Parents and other adults are frequently at a loss as to explaining how to build a kit model let alone the kinds of models discussed here. So to better support this Badge, we can hold a special Special Model Building Workshop where boys can learn all the various techniques that will come in handy for completing this Badge.

Additional Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Steamtown National Park is about 30 minutes from either location.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Do THREE of the following:
    1. Name three types of modern freight trains. Explain why unit trains are more efficient than mixed freight trains.
    2. Name one Class I or regional railroad. Explain what major cities it serves, the locations of major terminals, service facilities, and crew change points, and the major commodities it carries.
    3. Using models or pictures, identify 10 types of railroad freight or passenger cars. Explain the purpose of each type of car.
    4. Explain how a modern diesel or electric locomotive develops power. Explain the terms dynamic braking and radial steering trucks.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Explain the purpose and formation of Amtrak. Explain, by the use of a timetable, a plan for making a trip by rail between two cities at least 500 miles apart. List the times of departure and arrival at your destination, the train number, and the type of service you want.
    2. List and explain the various forms of public/mass transit using rail as the fixed guide path.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Name four departments of a railroad company. Describe what each department does.
    2. Tell about the opportunities in railroading that interest you most and why.
    3. Name four rail support industries, Describe the function of each one.
    4. With your parent's and counselor's approval, interview someone employed in the rail industry. Learn what that person does and how this person became interested in railroading. Find out what type of schooling and training are required for this position.
  4. Explain the purpose of Operation Lifesaver and its mission.
  5. Do THREE of the following:
    1. List five safety precautions that help make trains safer for workers and passengers.
    2. Explain to your merit badge counselor why railroad rights-of-way are important for safety.
    3. List 10 safety tips to remember when you are near a railroad track (either on the ground or on a station platform) or aboard a train.
    4. Tell your counselor about the guidelines for conduct that should be followed when you are near or on railroad property. Explain the dangers of trespassing on railroad property.
    5. Tell what an automobile driver can do to safely operate a car at grade crossings, and list three things an automobile driver should never do at a grade crossing.
    6. Tell how to report a malfunction of grade crossing warning devices.
    7. List safety precautions a pedestrian should follow at a public crossing.
  6. Explain the appearance and meaning of the following warning signs and devices: advance warning sign, pavement markings, crossbucks, flashing red lights, crossing gates.
  7. Do EACH of the following:
    1. Explain how railroad signals operate and show two basic signal tyes using color and configuration.
    2. Explain the meaning of three whistle signals.
    3. Describe a way to signal a train for an emergency stop.
    4. Explain the use and function of the EOTD (end-of-train device) or FRED (Flashing rear end device) used on the last car of most trains.
  8. Select ONE of the following special-interest areas and complete the requirements:
    1. Model Railroading
      With your parent's and counselor's approval, do TWO of the following:
      1. Draw a layout of your own model railroad; or one that could be built in your home. Design a point-to-point track or loop with different routings. Include one of the following: turnaround or terminal or yard or siding.
      2. Build one model railroad car kit or one locomotive kit.*
      3. Name the scale of four popular model railroad gauges. Identify the scale of four model cars or locomotives.
      4. Locate the Web site of four model railroad - related manufacturers or magazine publishers. Print information on their products and services and discuss the information with your counselor.
      5. Build one railroad structure (from scratch or using a kit), paint and weather the structure, mount it on your layout or diorama, and make the surrounding area on a diorama scenic.
      6. Alone or with others, build a model railroad or modular layout, including ballast and scenery. Make electrical connections and operate a train. Describe what you enjoyed most.
      7. Participate in a switching contest on a timesaver layout and record your time.
    2. Railfanning
      With your parent's and counselor's approval, do TWO of the following:
      1. Visit a railroad museum, historical display, or a prototype railroad-sponsored public event. With permission, photograph, videotape, or sketch items of interest. Explain what you saw and describe your photos, sketches, or videotape.
      2. Purchase tickets and ride a scenic or historic railroad. Under supervision, photograph the equipment and discuss with your counselor the historic significance of the operation.
      3. Locate the Web site of four rail historical groups, then find information on the history of the rail preservation operations and purpose of each group. Talk with a member of one of the groups and find out how you might help.
      4. Plan a trip by rail between two points. Obtain a schedule and explain when the train should arrive at two intermediate points. Purchase the tickets and make the trip. Explain to your counselor what you saw.

*Done in the Special Model Building Workshop or can be done on your own at home

 

Description and Support

There isn't only great history to study and to be made, but there is the awesome experience of flying model rockets and there is no better place than Cape Acahela is the place to do that! We'll even help you build them!

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Build model rockets on site.
  • Fly rockets in our Lower Field flight range.
  • All launch equipment provided.
  • Model rockets can be ordered and shipped direct to Acahela to be available on arrival. (Especially handy for NJ units wishing to avoid engine permitting problems).
  • Additional Advanced Model Rocketry class available.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant plus the cost of whichever kit the unit selects, plus two rocket motors (between $6.50 and $12.00 additional depending on the kit and motors. No additional fee if the unit provides it's own kits and motors.)

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Tell the purpose of space exploration and include the following:
    1. Historical reasons
    2. Immediate goals in terms of specific knowledge
    3. Benefits related to Earth resources, technology, and new products.
  2. Design a collector's card, with a picture on the front and information on the back, about your favorite space pioneer. Share your card and discuss four other space pioneers with your counselor.
  3. Build, launch, and recover a model rocket.* Make a second launch to accomplish a specific objective. (Rocket must be built to meet the safety code of the National Association of Rocketry. See the "Model Rocketry" chapter)
    Identify and explain the following rocket parts:
    1. Body tube
    2. Engine mount
    3. Fins
    4. Igniter
    5. Launch lug
    6. Nose cone
    7. Payload
    8. Recovery system
    9. Rocket engine
  4. Discuss and demonstrate each of the following:
    1. The law of action-reaction.
    2. How rocket engines work
    3. How satellites stay in orbit
    4. How satellite pictures of Earth and pictures of other planets are made and transmitted.
  5. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Discuss with your counselor an unmanned space exploration mission and an early manned mission. Tell about each mission's major discoveries, its importance, and what we learned from it about the planets, moons, or regions of space explored.
    2. Using magazine photographs, news clippings, and electronic articles (such as from the Internet), make a scrapbook about a current planetary mission.
    3. Design an unmanned mission to another planet or moon that will return samples of its surface to Earth. Name the planet or moon your spacecraft will visit. Show how your design will cope with the conditions of the planet's or moon's environment.
  6. Describe the purpose and operation of ONE of the following:
    1. Space shuttle
    2. International Space Station
  7. Design an inhabited base located on the Moon or Mars. Make drawings or a model of your base. In your design, consider and plan for the following:
    1. Source of energy
    2. How it will be constructed
    3. Life-support system
    4. Purpose and function
  8. Discuss with your counselor two possible careers in space exploration that interest you. Find out the qualifications, education, and preparation required and discuss the major responsibilities of those positions.

* Pennsylvania does not have any restrictions on model rocket engines similar to those in New Jersey. NJ units visiting with us can have their rocket kits and engines shipped directly to Camp Acahela to avoid any permitting problems.

 

Description and Support

Know where you are, where to place a building, or knowing what property belongs to you are some of the questions surveying will answer for you. Learn all the skills in this ancient, but totally modern skill.

Support provided:

  • Approved Merit Badge Counselor.
  • Daytime meeting to review pre-reqs and already completed worksheets.
  • Daytime class work if needed.
  • Terrific environment for doing field survey work.
  • Professional surveyors available.

This is currently supported at Camp Acahela and Goose Pond.

Class size: No restrictions

Advance notice needed: Two weeks is preferred.

Cost to the unit is: $6.00 per participant

Patches for the completed award are available at a cost of $2.29 each and can be purchased at Camp Acahela or at the Scout Service Center's Scout Shop.

Merit Badge Requirements

Pre-requisite key

  1. Show that you know first aid for the types of injuries that could occur while surveying, including cuts, scratches, snakebite, insect stings, tick bites, heat and cold reactions, and dehydration. Explain to your counselor why a surveyor should be able to identify the poisonous plants and poisonous animals that are found in your area.
  2. Find and mark the corners of a five-sided lot that has been laid out by your counselor to fit the land available. Set an instrument over each of the corners and record the angle turned between each line and the distance measured between each corner, as directed by your counselor. With the assistance of the counselor, compute the error of closure from the recorded notes. The error of closure must not be more than 5 feet. From the corners, take compass readings or turn angles to trees, shrubs, and rocks and measure to them. All measurements should be made using instruments, methods, and accuracies consistent with current technology.
  3. From the field notes gathered for requirement 2, draw to scale a map of your survey. Submit a neatly drawn copy.
  4. Write a metes and bounds description for the five-sided lot in requirement 2.
  5. Use one of the corner markers from requirement 2 as a benchmark with an assumed elevation of 100 feet. Using a level and rod, determine the elevation of the other four corner markers.
  6. Get a copy of the deed to your property, or a piece of property assigned by your counselor, from the local courthouse or title agency.
  7. Tell what GPS is; discuss with your counselor the importance of GPS and how it is changing the field of surveying.
  8. Discuss the importance of surveying with a licensed surveyor. Also discuss the various types of surveying and mapping, and applications of surveying technology to other fields. Discuss career opportunities in surveying and related fields. Discuss qualifications and preparation for such a career.

 

Scout Service and Training Center

If you need help with your Scout unit, or just a new uniform, the staff of the Scout Service and Training Center is here to help you make Scouting successful in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

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